FTCE English 6-12 Ultimate Guide2019-07-01T19:16:16+00:00

FTCE English 6-12: Ultimate Guide and Practice Test

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FTCE FTCE English 6-12

FTCE English 6-12 Quick Facts

The FTCE examinations measure your ability to demonstrate the mastery level of the knowledge and skills needed to be an effective beginning educator or educational leader pursuant to Chapter 1012 , Florida Statutes. This subject area exam tests your readiness to teach English in grades 6-12.

Two sections make up the English 6–12 subject area examination. There is an 80 question multiple-choice section and a written performance section that is comprised of 1 essay.

Cost:

First Attempt: $150 (full battery)

Retake:

$75 (single section)

$150 (both sections)

Scoring:

Multiple-Choice Section: A scaled score of at least 200 is required to pass.

Written Performance Section: At least 8 out of 12 points are required to pass.

You must pass both sections in order to pass this examination.

Pass rate:

In 2018, 1,423 tests were administered to first-time test takers. The passing rates are shown below:

Multiple-Choice Section 64%

Written Performance Section 70%

Study time:

In order to feel prepared for the test, plan to spend several weeks studying. It is helpful to create a schedule for yourself ahead of time by breaking down the test topics into different weeks. This way, you will know you have enough time to study each topic covered on the test.

What test takers wish they would’ve known:

  • Keep an eye on the time to make sure you are able to complete the test in the 2.5-hour time frame.
  • Any breaks taken are considered part of the 2.5 hour testing time.
  • It is better to guess on a question you don’t know the answer to than to leave it unanswered.

Information and screenshots obtained from: http://www.fl.nesinc.com/testPage.asp?test=013

Exam Content

Overview

The exam has five competencies in the multiple-choice section, and one competency that requires a written response:

  • English Language (23%)
  • Writing Skills (21%)
  • Literacy Processes (21%)
  • Fiction, Non-Fiction, and Informational Texts (23%)
  • Response to Media (12%)
  • Literary Analysis (Written Response)

So, let’s talk about English Language first.

English Language

This competency includes about 18 multiple-choice questions which make up about 23% of the entire exam.

This section tests your knowledge of the effective use of the English language.

Let’s talk about some concepts that you will more than likely see on the test.

Connotation and Denotation of Key Words

Connotation is the feeling a word implies or creates. Denotation is the dictionary definition of a word. See the examples below:

  • Chick – We all know that a chick is a baby bird. But these days, it is considered to be a derogatory term for women. While it’s still a term associated with females, in no way does it uphold the characteristics of a respected lady.
  • Rock – If you take it literally, then it could generally mean a stone composed of some type of minerals. But apart from that, a rock could also refer to an individual who offers you security and stability.

Structure and Meaning of Words

Prefixes and suffixes can be added to a base or root word to change the meaning. Prefixes are added to the beginning of a base word, and suffixes are added to the end.

Here is a word with a prefix and a suffix added to the root word:

non + conform + ist

not    go along   one who does something

A nonconformist is someone who does not go along with others.

Figurative Language

Figurative language makes writing more interesting. Figurative language, such as idioms, metaphors, similes, hyperboles, and personification, help authors create impact and meaning in their writing by going beyond the literal meaning of words on a page.

Here are some examples of figurative language:

And that’s some basic info about English Language.

Writing Skills

This competency includes about 17 multiple-choice questions which make up about 21% of the entire exam.

This section tests your knowledge of effective writing skills.

Let’s talk about some concepts that you will plausibly see on the test.

Forms of Writing

Expository WritingThis type of writing presents reasons, explanations, or steps in a process. Typical characteristics include:

  • Organization
  • Topic sentence, thesis statement, and subtopics
  • Transitions
  • Evidence and examples
  • Conclusion

Narrative WritingThis type of writing tells a story that includes a beginning, middle, and end. Typical characteristics include:

  • Problem and solution
  • Characters and setting
  • Rising action and climax
  • Plot
  • Dialogue

Persuasive Writing– This type of writing presents the development of a logical argument. Typical characteristics include:

  • Clear, concise, and defined thesis
  • Strong introduction
  • The well-developed argument with strong support
  • Organized structure
  • Conclusion

Argumentative Writing– This type of writing takes a position on an issue or topic. It explains and supports the position with research. Typical characteristics include:

  • A clear, firm, and debatable thesis
  • Background information on the topic
  • Organization and transitions
  • Effective and thorough research
  • Incorporation of logos, pathos, and ethos

Writing Process

The writing process is a series of steps followed in order to produce a coherent piece of writing. Steps include:

  • Prewriting– This is the first stage of the writing process. It consists of a combination of brainstorming and outlining.
  • Drafting– This is where the author writes an initial draft.
  • Revising– This is where the author reviews, alters and amends their initial draft.
  • Editing– This is where the author reads each sentence carefully to make sure that his or her words are serving the correct purpose.  
  • Proofreading– This is where the author checks for and corrects spelling, grammatical, and punctuation errors.
  • Publishing– This is the final step of the writing process. It is the presentation of the author’s final draft of writing.  

Literary Processes

This competency includes about 17 multiple-choice questions which make up about 21% of the entire exam

This section tests your knowledge of literacy processes across genres.

Let’s talk about some concepts that you will likely see on the test.

Text Complexity

Research shows that while the level of reading in college and careers has increased, the complexity of texts read in grades K-12 has decreased. This causes a gap for graduating high school students. It is important to have a measurable method for making sure students read on grade level.

To determine the complexity of the text, three factors are considered:

  • Qualitative evaluation of the text

Levels of meaning, structure, language conventionality and clarity, and knowledge demands

  • Quantitative evaluation of the text

Readability measures and other scores of text complexity

  • Matching reader to text and task

Reader variables (such as motivation, knowledge, and experiences) and task variables (such as purpose and the complexity generated by the task assigned and the questions posed)

Text Analysis

Teaching the following strategies may help students to analyze a text:

Text Structure

Text structures refer to how the information in a text is organized. Informational text is typically organized into one of six structures:

  • Cause and Effect- an action or event causes another action or event
  • Chronological- written in order of time/date
  • Problem and Solution- a problem is presented, and then a solution is found
  • Spatial- how a certain space is arranged
  • Compare and Contrast- describes similarities and differences
  • Descriptive- describes how something looks

Fiction, Non-Fiction, and Informational Texts

This competency includes about 18 multiple-choice questions which make up about 23% of the entire exam.

This section tests your knowledge of fiction, non-fiction, and informational texts.

Let’s look at some concepts that are likely to pop up on the test.

Genres

The word genre means “artistic category or style.” A literary genre is a style of writing. Your favorite literary genre might be science fiction, for example. Three additional genres include:

  • Drama– stories with characters that have dialog and action, typically written with the purpose of being acted out on a stage
  • Biography– non-fiction text about a person’s life
  • Speeches- oral communication typically presented to an audience about a topic of interest

Critical Approaches

A critical approach focuses on the reader (or audience) and his or her experience of a literary work, as opposed to the author or the content and form of the work.

Examples of Critical Approaches:

  • Gender– examines the role and image of men and women in literature
  • Sociological– examines the cultural, economic, and political context in literature
  • Anthropological– examines humanist and social science strategies in the literature
  • Psychological– examines the effect that modern psychology has on literature
  • Historical– examines a literary work by investigating the social, cultural, and intellectual context

Response to Media

This competency includes about 10 multiple-choice questions which make up about 12% of the entire exam.

This section tests your knowledge of critical responses to media.

Here is a concept that is likely to be part of the test:

Analyzing Media

Students should be taught to analyze media, evaluating meaning, intent, effect, and technique.

Key questions to ask when analyzing media messages include:

  • Evaluating meaning: What is this about? What has been left out? How might people interpret this message differently?
  • Intent: Who made this message? Who paid for this message?
  • Effect: Who might benefit or be harmed by this message? How might people respond?
  • Technique: What techniques were used? Why were they used? How do they communicate the message?

Literary Analysis

This competency accounts for 100% of the written performance section of the exam.

This section tests your ability to demonstrate how to respond critically via literary analysis.

Let’s talk about how to write a literary analysis.

The writer must first develop a clear and coherent thesis statement. The thesis statement is found in the introductory paragraph and offers the main point in one sentence. Once this has been stated, a writer must proceed with ample evidence and relevant details to support the thesis. This includes using the research process, paraphrasing information from sources, and citing all sources that provide relevant information to the writer’s main argument. The writer must use postsecondary level English through varied word choice, semantics, and language conventions. The literary analysis should be written in a style that increases the reader’s interest and understanding of the topic.

And that’s some basic info about the FTCE English 6-12 exam.

Exam Content Practice Test

Question 1

Which of the following contains a root that means “to look”?

  1. inspect
  2. describe
  3. advocate
  4. conduct

Correct Answer: 1

Explanations:

  1. “Inspect” contains the root “spect” which means “to look.”
  2. “Describe” contains the root “scribe” which means “to write.”
  3. “Advocate” contains the root “voc” which means “voice.”
  4. “Conduct” contains the root “duct” which means “to lead.”

Question 2

Precise language usage is more important for written communication than verbal communication in all ways except:

  1. The reader can’t ask clarifying questions in the written text.
  2. Visual cues are not available to help the reader determine to mean.
  3. The reader can’t use the visual context of a situation to determine to mean in written text.
  4. The author’s tone is implied in the written text, which could confuse a reader’s interpretation of meaning.

Correct Answer: 2

Explanations:

  1. In spoken communication, the speaker can answer questions in real time to clarify meaning. Because the author isn’t always present to ask questions, precise language and word choice is important.
  2. In spoken communication, there is usually a visual context for what the speaker is saying. A speaker saying, “Bring me that,” would accompany his speech with a motion. Just written, the reader has little to go on to determine what “that” is referring to.
  3. Writing that is lacking precise description or language leaves the reader to fill in the blanks, which can lead to a misunderstanding of the text.
  4. In spoken communication, the speaker’s tone and mood are easily understood by listening to the speaker’s intonation and inflections. This element must be communicated with careful, specific word choice in writing.

Question 3

Which of the following is an example of personification?

  1. The tree scratched at my window every time the wind blew.
  2. The rain was coming down so hard that it felt like a bucket of water had been poured on my head.
  3. The cow couldn’t catch the flies with her curly tail.
  4. Her backpack weighed a ton, slowing her down on the way to school.

Correct Answer: 1

Explanations:

  1. This is an example of personification.
  2. This is an example of a simile.
  3. This is an example of alliteration.
  4. This is an example of hyperbole.

Question 4

While reading, a student comes across the unknown word “sanitize.” He notices in the sentence the words “dirty, ” “but,” and “now clean.” He determines that sanitize must be the opposite of dirty. Which strategy did he use to define the unknown word?

  1. defining meaning from structural clues and morphology
  2. defining meaning using phonemic awareness
  3. defining meaning from context clues
  4. defining meaning using a homograph

Correct Answer: 3

Explanations:

  1. Using structural clues would mean using only a prefix, suffix, or root to define the word.
  2. Using phonetic awareness involves comparing words with the same sounding parts.
  3. The student used other words in the sentence to create context and meaning for the unknown word.
  4. Using a homograph to define a word is not a correct way to determine word meanings.

Question 5

Which of the following is the greatest contributing factor to the fall of the Western Roman Empire?

  1. Increased pressure of trying to feed the enormous population of Rome
  2. The feeding of Christians to the lions as entertainment for the Romans
  3. Pressure on the northern frontiers by Germanic tribes and the decline of central authority
  4. Lead water pipes that poisoned the ruling class

Correct answer: 3. The fall of the Western Roman Empire is marked by a series of events beginning in the late 4th century. Many of these markers, such as the deaths of emperors, resulted in political instability. Also, Germanic tribes in the northern regions began to recapture many Roman lands and apply pressure on the northern borders of Rome, eventually sacking Rome in 410 and 455.

Question 6

A teacher has the students do the following:

  • Determine a writing audience
  • Identify a purpose
  • Provide a list of writing topics

Based on the list of activities, which stage of writing are the students most likely working on?

  1. prewriting
  2. editing
  3. drafting
  4. publishing

Correct Answer: 1

Explanations:

  1. During the prewriting process, students are brainstorming writing topics, identifying the purpose of their writing, and establishing the audience to which they will write.
  2. During the editing process, students are revising their work to make structural and grammatical corrections.
  3. Drafting, or writing a rough draft, is after the prewriting stage but before the editing stage. This is where the student writes the initial draft.
  4. Publishing is the last stage and is accomplished when the writing is complete.

Question 7

Mrs. Loucks is planning a unit on argumentative writing. In which order should she present the information to students to ensure they are the most successful while composing their assignments?

  1. review outlining, teach thesis statements, read example papers, review the writing process, discuss finding and citing sources, write rough drafts, publish final drafts
  2. teach thesis statements, review the writing process, read example papers, review outlining, discuss finding and citing sources, write rough drafts, publish final drafts
  3. discuss finding and citing sources, review the writing process, read example papers, teach thesis statements, review outlining, write rough drafts, publish final drafts
  4. read example papers, teach thesis statements, discuss finding and citing sources, review outlining, review the writing process, write rough drafts, publish final drafts.

Correct Answer: 4

Explanations:

  1. The most logical order would be: read example papers, teach thesis statements, discuss finding and citing sources, review outlining, review the writing process, write rough drafts, publish final drafts.
  2. The most logical order would be: read example papers, teach thesis statements, discuss finding and citing sources, review outlining, review the writing process, write rough drafts, publish final drafts.
  3. The most logical order would be: read example papers, teach thesis statements, discuss finding and citing sources, review outlining, review the writing process, write rough drafts, publish final drafts.
  4. By starting with examples, then pulling out and teaching skills specific to writing an argumentative essay, and finally reviewing outlining and the writing process, the teacher can ensure that students will have the most success completing a final draft.

Question 8

Which of the following is NOT a benefit of incorporating self-assessment and peer-assessment into the students’ writing process?

  1. Students will use higher level thinking skills to analyze and evaluate their writing.
  2. Students can identify strengths and weaknesses for future writings.
  3. Students can understand how to set attainable writing goals.
  4. Students can help in grading writing assignments for the teacher.

Correct Answer: 4

Explanations:

  1. This is a benefit of incorporating self-assessment and peer-assessment in the students’ writing process.
  2. This is a benefit of incorporating self-assessment and peer-assessment in the students’ writing process.
  3. This is a benefit of incorporating self-assessment and peer-assessment in the students’ writing process.
  4. Students should not help grade fellow students’ papers. This is inappropriate; only the teacher should grade students’ work.

Question 9

Which of the following should not be considered when evaluating an internet source for credibility on a topic?

  1. the amount of relevant information provided by the source
  2. the author(s) and publisher of the website
  3. the date of publication or copyright date
  4. the design of the website and the frequency of spelling and/or grammar errors

Correct Answer: 1

Explanations:

  1. Simply because a source has a lot or a little information to use, does not mean it is a valid source.
  2. This should be considered when evaluating whether a source is reliable.
  3. This should be considered when evaluating whether a source is reliable.
  4. This should be considered when evaluating whether a source is reliable.

Question 10

Mr. Crusher’s students have completed researching their topics and are ready to begin writing. What would be the best way for Mr. Crusher to prepare the students to begin writing?

  1. Provide the class with a definition of “topic sentence” and let them work in pairs to write paragraphs about their topic.
  2. Using an example guiding question and research notes, model for the class how to write a topic sentence that summarizes the main idea and support it with evidence from the research.
  3. Pass out example paragraphs for students to use as a guide for their own work.
  4. Show them how to create a bibliography.

Correct Answer: 2

Explanations:

  1. Just defining a topic sentence is not as helpful as modeling the process for students.
  2. Modeling how the research question can help them craft their topic sentence would be useful to students who are not familiar with research-based writing. Using an example question and research will model a similar process to what the students will experience in their own writing.
  3. While a great resource, an example paragraph, without demonstrating the connection to the research question and information, may not offer enough guidance for students to then work on their own.
  4. A bibliography is not in the essay or paragraph but would come after it.

Question 11

Fluency is measured by which three criteria?

  1. accuracy, prosody, and speed
  2. vocabulary, speed, and comprehension
  3. accuracy, speed, and vocabulary
  4. ability to self-correct, sight word recall, prosody.

Correct Answer: 1

Explanations:

  1. Fluency is measured by accuracy, prosody, and speed.
  2. Comprehension depends on fluent reading, but it is not how a student’s fluency is measured.
  3. A student having a strong, varied vocabulary may help them read more fluently and improve word recognition, but is not a measure of fluency.
  4. Self-correcting while reading is important to comprehension, but it is not a measure of fluency.

Question 12

Aspects of a text that can only be measured by a reader (e.g. meaning, purpose, structure, and knowledge demands) are what type of complexity measure?

  1. task consideration
  2. quantitative
  3. reader consideration
  4. qualitative

Correct Answer: 4

Explanations:

  1. Reader and task considerations are aspects of reading a text that relate to the reader or the reader’s purpose in reading the text. These considerations are determined and measured by teachers.
  2. Quantitative measures are aspects of a text that are too hard for a reader to measure. These are typically measured by computer software.
  3. Reader and task considerations are aspects of reading a text that relate to the reader or the reader’s purpose in reading the text. These considerations are determined and measured by teachers.
  4. Qualitative measures are aspects of a text that can only be measured by a reader.

Question 13

Which of the following groups of words best indicates a time sequence?

  1. later, now, because of
  2. during, last, earlier, however
  3. first, last, later, now, after
  4. on the other hand, however, although, like, as

Correct Answer: 3

Explanations:

  1. Because of is not a sequencing term.
  2. However, is not a sequencing term; it is one of comparison.
  3. This is the correct answer though there are a few more key terms relating to sequencing including second, finally, during.
  4. On the other hand, however, although, like, and as are all terms relating to comparisons in expository text.

Question 14

When students are given two texts on the same subject, one persuasive and one informative, what approach would be most helpful to determining purpose?

  1. Determine whether each topic sentence is a claim or factual statement.
  2. Summarize each paragraph in the margin and identify each paragraph’s main idea.
  3. Evaluate the author’s use of citations and verify that the sources are reliable.
  4. Evaluate the author’s use of figurative language.

Correct Answer: 1

Explanations:

  1. The topic sentences indicate the goal of the paragraph. If it is making an argumentative claim, the reader will know the author intends to persuade. If it is a factual statement, the reader will know the author’s intention is to inform.
  2. Summarizing and identifying main ideas will help the reader’s comprehension, but the reader would then have to go a step further to evaluate whether those ideas are persuasive or informative.
  3. Citations and sources do not determine purpose.
  4. Figurative language may be present in the writing but is not determinative of the author’s purpose.

Question 15

When reading and analyzing informational texts on the same topic, which element(s) might students compare?

  1. quality of evidence
  2. facts and opinions
  3. use of dialogue
  4. author bias

Correct Answer:  1, 2, 4

Explanations:

  1. This is an element of informational text that could be analyzed.
  2. This is an element of informational text that could be analyzed.
  3. Dialogue is not usually an element of informational text.
  4. This is an element of informational text that could be analyzed.

Question 16

During reading and research, it is important to check your understanding of a passage by examining the author’s statements and opinions. In order to do this, students should analyze a passage for:

  1. any bias or illogical leaps in the author’s argument
  2. fully supported reasoning with credible sources
  3. author’s background and life experiences
  4. how the information matches other articles they’ve read

Correct Answer: 1

Explanations:

  1. Identifying author bias or illogical arguments is key to assessing the validity of a passage.
  2. An author with fully supported reasoning and sources is reliable and unlikely to need questioning.
  3. The author’s background can be important to assessing his opinion, but this is not the best answer.
  4. Comparing a text to other texts is not relevant to challenging an author’s statements or opinions.

Question 17

Mr. Wilmer is planning a unit on citing research sources for his students. Which of the following activities would most engage students in the activity?

  1. Use PowerPoint to demonstrate how to properly cite sources
  2. Have students write an essay about the importance of research citation
  3.  Watch a video about famous authors
  4.  Have students interview various classmates, faculty, and other staff at the school and cite their interviews

Correct Answer: 4. Having students create their own sources by interviewing individuals from around the school and then practice citing them is a great engagement activity.The incorrect options would not engage students as much as citing an interview the student conducted themselves.

Question 18

Mr. Michaels is working to improve the quality of discussions in his class. While he can usually count on having plenty of student share their ideas on a topic, they tend to simply share their answer instead of responding to or building on the ideas of other students. Which of the following strategies would help develop this skill?

  1. Provide sentence stems that promote a summary of the previous speaker’s thoughts.
  2. Provide direct instruction on appropriate ways to disagree with a classmate’s comments.
  3. Organize the room in a way that allows students to see each other while speaking, like a circle.
  4. Have students take notes on each other’s comments.

Correct Answer: 1, 2, 3

Explanations:

  1. Providing sentence stems is a great way to facilitate discussions. It gives students a script for having meaningful conversations and focuses their attention on the objectives.
  2. Giving guidelines for how to disagree with a classmate will help students use appropriate language and give them a script if they feel timid about responding to peers.
  3. Changing the classroom layout is beneficial for discussions as students can see one another and conversation feels more natural to the students.
  4. Requiring extensive note taking during the discussion could slow it down and decrease the chances of it being a genuine conversation.

Question 19

When introducing new material and scaffolding for student’s oral presentation skills, a teacher should be sure to:

  1. build review into each lesson to ensure students are retaining previous skills.
  2. start with the easiest skill and build up to the most difficult.
  3. allow for self-reflection and peer review.
  4. model skills throughout the unit and lessons.

Correct Answer: 2

Explanations:

  1. Reviewing material is an important part of scaffolding, but this answer does not address the whole purpose of scaffolding in a unit.
  2. Scaffolding material means providing a structure to move students from the most basic skills to the most complex. So, starting with easy and working to more complex will help the most students be successful while learning a new topic.
  3. While self-assessment and peer review are important aspects of learning new material, they aren’t entirely related to the scaffolding process.
  4. Teacher modeling is particularly important when introducing new skills, but is less useful as students progress throughout a unit.

Question 20

It’s cold outside, put on a coat so you don’t get frostbite.

Which part of the sentence contains the error?

  1. It’s
  2. outside, put
  3. so
  4. frostbite.
  5. No error.

Correct Answer: 2

Explanations:

  1. “It’s” is a contraction of it and is, which is correct in this sentence.
  2. This is a comma splice where two independent clauses are put together by a comma when they should be connected by a semicolon, a period, or a conjunction.
  3. “So” is a coordinating conjunction and is correct.
  4. A period is the correct ending for this sentence.
  5. There is an error in this sentence.

Question 21

David struggles with finding socks that are just right; either they are too tight around his ankle, nor they are too loose and bunch up around his toes.

Which part of the sentence contains the error?

  1. David struggles
  2. right; either
  3. ankle, nor
  4. too loose
  5. No error.

Correct Answer: 3

Explanations:

  1. David struggles is correct subject-verb agreement.
  2. This semicolon separates two independent clauses.
  3. Either/or and neither/nor are correlating conjunctions; in this case, “nor” should be “or”.
  4. The words “too” and “loose” are words commonly confused, but in this case they are used appropriately.
  5. There is an error in this sentence.

Question 22

The principal, Dr. Blanchard, explained the attendance policy to the parents in excruciating detailed manner so there would be no questions about what qualified as an excused absence.

Which part of the sentence contains the error?

  1. Dr. Blanchard,
  2. excruciating detailed
  3. would be no questions
  4. what qualified
  5. No error.

Correct Answer: 2

Explanations:

  1. This appositive is appropriate.
  2. “Detailed” is an adjective, so “excruciatingly,” an adverb, should be used to modify it.
  3. This tense correct.
  4. The whole sentence is written in past tense, so this verb phrase is correct.
  5. There is an error in this sentence.

Use the following excerpt for the following three questions. 

Excerpt from Inaugural Address by John F. Kennedy, January 20, 1961

1 “In your hands, my fellow citizens, more than in mine, will rest the final success or failure of our course. Since this country was founded, each generation of Americans has been summoned to give testimony to its national loyalty. The graves of young Americans who answered the call to service surround the globe.
2 Now the trumpet summons us again – not as a call to bear arms, though arms we need; not as a call to battle, though embattled we are – but a call to bear the burden of a long twilight struggle, year in and year out, ‘rejoicing in hope, patient in tribulation’- a struggle against the common enemies of man: tyranny, poverty, disease, and war itself.
3 Can we forge against these enemies a grand and global alliance, North and South, East and West, that can assure a more fruitful life for all mankind? Will you join in that historic effort?
4 In the long history of the world, only a few generations have been granted the role of defending freedom in its hour of maximum danger. I do not shank from this responsibility – I welcome it. I do not believe that any of us would exchange places with any other people or any other generation. The energy, the faith, the devotion which we bring to this endeavor will light our country and all who serve it– and the glow from that fire can truly light the world.
5 And so, my fellow Americans: ask not what your country can do for you– ask what you can do for your country.
6 My fellow citizens of the world: ask not what America will do for you, but what together we can do for the freedom of man.
7 Finally, whether you are citizens of America or citizens of the world, ask of us the same high standards of strength and sacrifice which we ask of you. With a good conscience our only sure reward, with history the final judge of our deeds, let us go forth to lead the land we love, asking His blessing and His help, but knowing that here on earth God’s work must truly be our own.”

Question 23

Which of the following best defines the word summons as it is used in paragraph 2 of the selection?

  1. A court order
  2. A call to action
  3. To draw away from
  4. To make noise

Correct Answer: 2. The word “summons” in this context is best defined as a “call to action”. The excerpt even defines the word, in a way, when it reads: “not as a call to bear arms, . . . but a call to bear the burden…” Although “a court order” is also called a “summons,” in this context, that definition does not make sense. Also, answer choice D offers a similarly tricky distractor, as the word “trumpet” that comes directly before “summons” could lead someone to choose “to make a noise,” as that’s what trumpets do. Be careful of these kinds of seemingly easy answers and instead look for the most correct answer.

Question 24

The writer’s purpose in this speech is best described as:

  1. a stirring and inspiring call to patriotism
  2. a defamatory denunciation of global powers
  3. a complaint against indolent citizens
  4. congratulatory remarks regarding the current transition of power

Correct Answer: 1. This is the best answer. “Stirring and inspiring” best describes the effect this speech has on its intended audience, and “call” is certainly the purpose. Certain word choices in the distractors provide key evidence that makes them incorrect. Answer “B” uses negative language—denunciation and defamatory—which do not correctly reflect the tone of the speech. “C” uses the words “complaint” and “indolent,” which also incorrectly reflect a negative tone not represented here. The last answer “D” does use positive language with “congratulatory,” but the content is incorrect—the speaker is not praising the fact that he has risen to power. This speech is directed at the people in general.

Question 25

The main idea of this passage can best be summarized as:

  1. people should stop being so lazy and fix the world’s problems
  2. too many have died fighting for national loyalty
  3. we the people should be asking ourselves what we should do for the common good
  4. other nations should rise up and help out

 

 

Correct Answer: 3. This is the best summary of the main idea. The speech applies to “the people” in a unified way; it calls for them to make questions of themselves, and it applies these ideals to a general, human “good”. The speaker does not condemn his audience, nor does it use a complaining tone, so choices “A” and “B” are out. Although it makes a general call for citizens of the world, its main focus is the people in general, so “D” is also out.

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