CSET Physical Education Ultimate Guide2019-07-01T19:05:16+00:00

CSET Physical Education: Ultimate Guide and Practice Test

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CSET Physical Education
Quick Facts

The California Subject Examinations for Teachers for Physical Education (CSET PE) exam is required for California teachers who teach physical education in the public school system. It is designed to measure a candidate’s knowledge of the content covered in each subtest to ensure a teacher is qualified to instruct students in this subject area.

The CSET PE is a computer-based test that includes 3 different subtests with a passing rate of 220 per subtest.

Subtest 1

  • 40 multiple choice questions
  • 2 constructed response questions
  • 1 hour and 45 minutes to complete

Subtest 2

  • 40 multiple choice questions
  • 2 constructed response questions
  • 1 hour and 30 minutes to complete

Subtest 3

  • 40 multiple choice questions
  • 1 constructed response questions
  • 1 hour and 45 minutes to complete

The total length of time for the entire test if all three subtests are taken is 5 hours with 15 additional minutes to complete a nondisclosure agreement and tutorial. Any breaks taken are included as part of your available testing time.  

Cost:

The cost for the entire test including all 3 subtests is $297. The price for each individual subtest is $99. Registration fees must be paid using credit, debit, or check card.

       

Scoring:

In order to pass the CSET PE exam, you need to score a 220 on each individual subtest. Results are reported as scaled scores. The scaled score is determined based on the number of raw points earned in each subtest (multiple choice and constructed response) and the weighting of each section. Raw scores are converted to a scale of 100 to 300, with 220 being the minimum passing score. Test results are available within 7 weeks of testing.

Study time:

Study time will vary from person to person but plan to spend many hours over several weeks to feel fully prepared. Continue studying until you have covered each topic of the test and feel confident with the practice questions.

What test takers wish they would’ve known:

  • There is no penalty for incorrect answers, so it is better to guess than to leave a question unanswered.  
  • Pace yourself, and make sure you are not spending too much time on difficult questions. You can always come back to a question later.
  • Plan to arrive early. Check the test administration site for the time you should arrive.

Information and screenshots obtained from the National Evaluation Series website: http://www.ctcexams.nesinc.com/Home.aspx

Subtest I

Overview

Subtest I has 40 multiple-choice questions and 2 constructed-response questions. You will have 1 hour and 45 minutes to complete this subtest.

There are two domains, both with specific competencies:

  • Growth, Motor Development, and Motor Learning
  • The Science of Human Movement

So, let’s start with Growth, Motor Development, and Motor Learning.

Growth, Motor Development, and Motor Learning

This section tests your knowledge of growth, motor development, and motor learning and their applications to the physical education environment.

Let’s discuss some concepts that will more than likely appear on the test.

Kinesthetic Discrimination

Kinesthetic discrimination is one’s ability to recognize changes that involve muscle feelings and body motions. This involves a body’s ability to maintain balance on a bike or to determine which way to run to catch the ball.

Skill acquisition is how athletes learn and retain new skills. There are three stages of skill acquisition: cognitive, associative, and autonomous. The cognitive stage is when the athlete has to think about the skill and how to retain it. This stage requires a lot of frequent feedback. The associative stage is the longest stage where the athlete practices the skill with errors becoming less frequent. The last stage, autonomous, is when the athlete can think about other aspects of the competition rather than just the skill alone.

Kinesthetic discrimination relates to skill acquisition because in order for athletes to move through the stages of skill acquisition they must understand their body’s muscle feelings and motions. An example of kinesthetic discrimination involved with skill acquisition is juggling. In the cognitive stage, the body focuses on throwing the object while determining what muscles need to be used. In the associative stage, the body begins to practice juggling to master this concept. Lastly, an individual in the autonomous stage would be able to juggle and walk around or spin around at the same time.  

Gross Motor Development

Gross motor development is the progression of skills learned that require the whole body to perform everyday functions. Examples include standing, walking, and sitting upright. It also includes hand-eye coordination like throwing, hitting, and kicking. A child is expected to hit milestones during certain age ranges. Each stage of development assumes that the preceding stages have already been achieved.

Check out more age groups for gross motor development as well as possible implications if milestones are not achieved. https://childdevelopment.com.au/resources/child-development-charts/gross-motor-developmental-chart/

Cerebral Palsy

Cerebral palsy is a muscle impairment condition caused by damage to the brain before or at birth. There are different types of cerebral palsy. Spastic cerebral palsy causes stiffness and movement difficulties. Dyskinetic (athetoid) cerebral palsy causes uncontrolled movements. Ataxic cerebral palsy causes problems with balance and depth perception. Cerebral palsy can affect motor learning and development. It can delay certain milestones a child should hit, delaying their overall motor development, or it can stop motor development entirely. A child with cerebral palsy struggles with a variety of motor development difficulties, including but not limited to:

  • Not reaching for toys by 4 months
  • Not sitting up by 7 months
  • Unable to crawl, walk, or move arms and legs in the usual way
  • Uncoordinated movements
  • Muscle tone that is too tight or too loose

The Science of Human Movement

This section tests your knowledge on the science of human movement, including body systems, biomechanical principles, effects of exercise, and components of wellness.

Here are some concepts that you may see on the test.

The Skeletal System

The skeletal system is the framework of the body that consists of the 206 bones and other connective tissues that protect and support the body tissues and various organs. The four main parts are the bones, ligaments, tendons, and joints.

Bone

  • Rigid form of connective tissue composed mostly of calcium
  • 5 types of bones: long, short, flat, irregular, and sesamoid

Ligament

  • Small band of dense, white, fibrous elastic tissue
  • Connects bones to bones
  • Assists in holding organs in place

Tendon

  • Tough, flexible, inelastic band of fibrous connective tissue
  • Connects muscles to bones

Joint

  • Connection of bones together
  • Hold the skeleton and support movement
  • Types of joints by function: synarthrosis, amphiarthrosis, and diarthrosis
  • Types of joints by the structure: fibrous, cartilaginous, and synovial

Trapezius Muscles

The trapezius muscle is one of the largest back muscles and active movement muscles that is used to tilt and turn the head and neck, shrug, and twist your arms. There are three areas of the trapezius muscle: upper fibers, middle fibers, and lower fibers. Each area does something different.

Upper Trapezius (Upper Fibers)

  • Goes across the tops of your shoulders
  • Can elevate shoulders
  • Helps extend, tilt, and rotate the neck

Middle Trapezius (Middle Fibers)

  • Helps bring shoulder blades back toward the spine
  • Helps stabilize the shoulder during certain arm movements

Lower Trapezius (Lower Fibers)

  • Upwardly rotates scapula
  • Works together with the upper fibers to assist with scapular retraction and adduction

Stress Management

Below are the five components of stress management.

Good Nutrition

  • Eat regular, balanced meals
  • Take vitamins regularly
  • Increase protein, calcium, and potassium intake- each helps to combat stress
  • Avoid “junk” food  

Sleep

  • Avoid caffeine, alcohol, and tobacco- each can upset sleep
  • Strive for 7-9 hours of sleep

Physical Exercise

  • Regular, moderate exercise helps relieve tension and elevate one’s mood
  • Focus on activities that loosen the muscles

Relaxation

  • Take slow, deep breaths to increase oxygen flow to brain
  • Inhale through the nose, exhale through the mouth
  • To relieve tension in body: tense and release muscle groups, starting with your toes all the way to your head

Kindness to Self

  • Engage in “distracting” activities (i.e. reading, visiting a park, shopping)
  • Engage in contemplative activities (i.e. listening to music, taking a bath, getting some sun)
  • Engage in care seeking activities (i.e. talking with a friend, writing in a journal, getting a massage)

Subtest II

Overview

Subtest II has 40 multiple-choice questions and 2 constructed-response questions. You will have 1 hour and 30 minutes to complete this subtest.

There are three domains, both with specific competencies:

  • The Sociology and Psychology of Human Movement
  • Movement Concepts and Forms
  • Assessment and Evaluation Principles

       

So, let’s start with The Sociology and Psychology of Human Movement.

The Sociology and Psychology of Human Movement

This section tests your knowledge on sociology and psychology of human movement, including personal and social development, motivation, and the role of physical activities in society.

Let’s discuss some concepts that will more than likely appear on the test.

Learned Helplessness

Learned helplessness is a condition in which individuals believe they have no control over what happens in their lives. They begin to think, feel, and act as if they are helpless. Learned helplessness is often associated with depression and anxiety, both of which threaten a person’s physical and mental well-being. This can lead to poor health as they falsely believe they have no power to change. Learned helplessness can lead to depression and stress, which can weaken the immune system and cause less effective recovery from health problems. Learned helplessness can impact a person’s desire to try any new physical activities or change the current amount of physical activity due to the beliefs that there is no self-control over life events.

Promoting Cooperation

Below are five key elements that represent the benefits of participation in cooperative learning:

  • Positive Interdependence– structure tasks so students are dependent on each other to achieve their goals (i.e. establish common goals, divide work equally, and conduct evaluation on group performance)
  • Individual Accountability– hold students accountable for their actions and decisions (i.e. activities should require the effort and knowledge of all group members so group members will participate and contribute to their full ability)
  • Face-to-Face Interaction– provide opportunities for students to support, encourage, and praise one another in their learning (meaningful face-to-face interaction cannot occur with large group size, groups with 2-4 members are ideal)
  • Collaborative Skills– These need to be modeled, verbalized, and reinforced by teachers and delivered in a systematic manner. These skills include listening, conflict resolution, supporting others, taking turns, and sharing.
  • Group Processing– the time allotted for discussing the experiences being presented to the students (i.e. verbal reflection occurs at the end of an activity to demonstrate understanding and facilitates the development of social skills)  

Movement Concepts and Forms

This section tests your knowledge on movement concepts and forms, including creative movement, dance, gymnastics, aquatics, and team and individual sports and activities.

Here are some concepts that you may see on the test.

Pickleball

Pickleball is a sport that combines elements of tennis, badminton, and ping-pong. It can be played indoors or outdoors on a badminton sized-court with a slightly modified tennis net. Pickleball is played with a paddle and a plastic ball with holes. It can be played as doubles or singles. Check out the website below for all official rules and regulations of the game. https://www.pickleball.com/rules-how-to-play-pickleball-s/106.htm

Stretching

Stretching is a form of physical exercise where a specific muscle or tendon is flexed in order to improve a muscle’s elasticity and achieve comfortable muscle tone. Stretching can improve athletic performance or relieve pain and tension. There are three main types of stretching: static, dynamic, and ballistic.

Static Stretching

  • Holding a position between 30-60 seconds to lengthen muscles
  • Complete after exercise
  • Benefits: relief from cramping, improved range of motion, and decrease in injury potential

Dynamic Stretching

  • Engaging in the joint’s range of motion for 2-3 seconds
  • Complete as a warm up before exercise
  • Benefits: prevent strain, increase blood flow, and enhance flexibility

Ballistic Stretching

  • Utilizes muscle activation through quick, jerky movements  
  • Complete as a warm up before exercise
  • Benefits: improves dynamic flexibility, muscles become ready for high impact activity, and enhances the motor performance of the muscles

Assessment and Evaluation Principles

This section tests your knowledge of selecting and implementing appropriate assessments to evaluate the principles of the physical education setting effectively.

Let’s discuss some concepts that will more than likely appear on the test.

Test Characteristics

Validity is how well a test measures what it is intended to measure. Examples of valid assessments:

  • Aerobic Endurance: students run the pacer
  • Anaerobic Endurance: students run a 400m race
  • Strength: students complete as many pull-ups as they possibly can
  • Agility: students complete ladder patterns
  • Flexibility: students complete sit-and-reach

Reliability is how consistent assessments are, meaning if you were to complete the same assessment twice you would get similar results. Examples of reliable assessments:

  • Any test can be unreliable if the student changes something they have done to improve or hinder results
  • Pacer Test: If students run the same speed, they will most likely achieve the same results.
  • Pull-Ups: If students use the same muscle groups, they will most likely achieve the same results.
  • Ladders: If students use the same arm movements, leg movements, and speed, they will most likely achieve the same results.

Objectivity is when assessment data is collected through measuring and observing facts. Examples of objective assessments:

  • True/False
  • Multiple Choice
  • Extended Matching

Types of Evaluations

Norm-Referenced Assessments (standardized tests)

  • The purpose is to compare and rank test takers in relation to one another
  • Determine if a test taker performed better or worse than a typical or average test taker
  • Usually, consist of multiple-choice questions, but sometimes includes open-ended responses
  • Usually based on some form of national standard

Criterion-Referenced Assessments (also known as content-referenced assessments)

  • Designed to measure a student’s performance with regard to the learning standards
  • Evaluate whether a student has learned a specific skill or concept
  • Individual teachers can create these assessments to test certain concepts
  • Includes a variety of question types: multiple-choice, open-ended response, true/false
  • Desirable to have every student pass, with the potential of earning a perfect score

Authentic Assessments

  • Requires application of what student has learned to a new situation
  • Often include real-world situations or applications
  • Integrated challenges with a range of skills
  • Maybe no “right” answer and may not be easily scored
  • Require higher-level thinking

Basic Statistical Applications

Central Tendency: describes the way data clusters around a central value

  • Average number of jumping jacks students can do in a minute
  • The average pace at which a student in fifth grade can run a mile

Variability: the spread of the data

  • Have students count the number of jumping jacks they can do in a minute and determine the least and greatest number students can jump from each class or grade level
  • Have students run a mile and determine the slowest and fastest pace in each class or grade level

Standard Scores: taking a raw score and transforming it into a common scale

  • Have students complete the physical fitness assessment

Norms: the average  

  • Typical catching ability for a child at a certain age
  • Typical balance ability for a child at a certain age
  • Typical agility ability for a child at a certain age

Correlations: shows whether variables are related

  • Height and weight

Subtest III

Overview

Subtest III has 40 multiple-choice questions and 1 constructed-response question. You will have 1 hour and 45 minutes to complete this subtest.

There are two domains, both with specific competencies:

  • Professional Foundations
  • Integration of Concepts

       

So, let’s start with Professional Foundations.

Professional Foundations

This section tests your knowledge on professional foundations in the field of physical education, including philosophy, history, research, and legal issues.

Here are some concepts that you may see on the test.

Inclusion

Inclusion is a scheduling structure in which special education students spend as much time as possible with general education students. This affects a physical education setting as there are certain accommodations that must be followed by law. Differentiated instruction must be present in order to meet the needs and abilities of all students. Inclusion enables all students to develop skills, successfully participate, and feel a sense of belonging.

Liability

Product liability is one of the major legal issues present in physical education. Product liability is when a piece of equipment is involved in an injury. Due to this liability, it is imperative that quality equipment is purchased, checked regularly, and kept in good condition, following all manufacturer’s instructions. Physical education teachers must teach safety to prevent injury to any child. This includes facility safety, equipment safety, and safety in instruction. Supervision must be present throughout the physical education classroom at varying levels at all times. Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn by all participants. Check out the link to learn more about safety in the physical education classroom. http://www.auburn.edu/~brocksj/4360hastietext/brock02_final.pdf

SHAPE America (Formally AAHPERD)

Society of Health and Physical Educators (SHAPE America) is the largest organization of health and physical education professionals. SHAPE America’s national standards for grades K-12 serve as the foundation for well-designed physical education programs throughout the country. They provide programs and resources to support educators at all levels. SHAPE America’s mission is to advance professional practice and promote research related to health and physical education to develop a nation with physically active and healthy youth.

Integration of Concepts

This section tests your knowledge on integrating other subject areas effectively with physical education.

Let’s discuss some concepts that will more than likely appear on the test.

Modifying Activities

It is necessary to sometimes modify activities in order for all students to be able to participate. Below is a list of modified activities:

Modify to Balance Competition

  • Kick or hit a stationary ball verses a pitched ball
  • Allow for certain length of time to get to the base
  • Allow ball to be caught in volleyball before hitting back over the net

Modify Equipment

  • Larger bat or racquet
  • Larger/lighter/softer ball

Analyze Positions  

  • Goalie or pitcher for a student that may have limited mobility

Physical Education and Mathematics

Physical education and mathematics are very closely related. In order to master certain physical education concepts, math skills must be understood. Running involves data and time, sports equipment involves geometry, scoring involves numeracy. Below are examples to promote the connection between both subjects for a variety of age groups. Examples of physical education and mathematics:

  • Estimate how long it will take to run 100m then determine the difference between actual time and estimation
  • Sort sporting equipment based on the shape
  • Determine who won the game and how much they won by
  • Determine types of lines and shapes found on a soccer field

And that’s some basic info about the exam.

Practice Questions and Answers

Question 1

Which of the following is NOT a benefit of exercise?

  1. Higher fat insulation and storage
  2. Increased blood flow to muscles
  3. Improved cardiovascular health
  4. Higher daily caloric consumption

Correct Answer:  1

Explanation: Higher fat levels result in increased insulation and fat storage. Exercise will typically reduce fat storage.

Question 2

Which of the following best describes an average four-year-old’s ability to walk?

  1. Their walking is choppy and uncoordinated
  2. Their walking is automatic and has an adult style
  3. Their walking is characterized by large, high steps and they tend to have one foot firmly on the ground
  4. Their walking still needs to be stabilized by an adult

Correct Answer:  2

Explanation: This is the best answer. By age four, a child’s walking ability should be fluid and mimic the walking style of an adult. All other answer choices describe an infant’s walking style.

Question 3

Which of the following best describes the purpose of a health education program in a school?

  1. To protect the health of the student body
  2. To educate students on how to make healthy choices
  3. To facilitate the education on topics such as sex, vaccinations, and abuse
  4. To meet state-required educational goals

Correct Answer:  2

Explanations:

  1. The purpose of the health program is not to protect the health of the student body, but to educate and emphasize the importance of making healthy decisions. The school is not logistically able to completely protect the health of the student body.
  2. The purpose of health education programs is to equip students to make healthy decisions in all aspects of their lives. The way health education programs do this is by highlighting the consequences of unhealthy decisions and discussing how to decide what decision is the best option; this is accomplished by educating the students on various topics.
  3. Facilitating education on relevant topics is how the purpose of the health education program is accomplished. The purpose is to encourage students to make healthy decisions through education; the purpose is not solely education.
  4. Meeting state goals might be the cause of a health education program, but it is not the purpose.

Question 4

In schools across the United States, there has been an increased awareness of health and fitness related issues, especially regarding proper diet and nutrition for adolescents. Which of the following has this increased awareness led to?

  1. An increased emphasis on promoting individuals’ lifelong participation in physical activity and exercises
  2. An increased emphasis on traditional physical activities in physical education classes
  3. A widespread belief that physical education and nutrition knowledge should be incorporated into standardized testing
  4. An increase in the number of time students are required to spend each day in physical education classes

Correct Answer:  1

Explanations:

  1. This is the best answer. As obesity among adolescents in increasing and the desire for children to have a greater knowledge of exercise and nutrition, physical education classes are trying to promoting lifelong participation in physical activities. This has led to a decrease in traditional P.E. exercises and an increase in more “fun” physical activities to show kids that physical activity can be enjoyable.
  2. As obesity among adolescents is increasing and more of a desire for children to have a greater knowledge of exercise and nutrition, physical education classes are trying to promoting lifelong participation in physical activities. This has led to a decrease in traditional P.E. exercises and an increase in more “fun” physical activities to show kids that physical activity can be enjoyable.
  3. Standardized testing for physical education and nutrition knowledge is not a widespread belief.
  4. There has not been a widespread increase in the amount of time required by students to spend in P.E. classes.

Question 5

Carbohydrates are most useful for the:

  1. conversion of starches and sugars to glucose.
  2. the building of muscle.
  3. absorption of nutrients by cells.
  4. replenishing stomach lining.

Correct Answer:  1

Explanations:

  1. This is the main use of carbohydrates.
  2. Building muscle is the main use of proteins.
  3. Fats help in the absorption of nutrients.
  4. The stomach lining replenishes itself. Carbohydrates do not play a direct role.

Question 6

Mrs. Gruntle is planning a health unit on substance abuse. Before beginning the unit, Mrs. Gruntle prepares a pretest to give the students. Which of the following is the most important advantage of the pretest?

  1. The pretest will encourage students to investigate what misconceptions they have about substance abuse
  2. The pretest will help Mrs. Gruntle recognize misconceptions students have about substance abuse
  3. The pretest will alert students to the serious nature of the unit topic
  4. The pretest will increase the students’ desire to learn about substance abuse

Correct Answer:  2

Explanations:

  1. The pretest will not encourage students to investigate any misconceptions they might have because it is not clear if the students will receive feedback on the exam. Without feedback, the students are not aware they have misconceptions about substance abuse.
  2. Many students develop misconceptions about substance abuse. To best educate the students on the effects of substance abuse, Mrs. Gruntle will need to know what misconceptions the students have, so they can be adequately addressed. The pretest will allow Mrs. Gruntle to identify various misconceptions the students have and this will allow her to develop instructional activities to correct misconceptions and develop a correct view of substance abuse among her students.
  3. Pretests are common in education to create a benchmark of student knowledge and identify weak areas. Because they are common, it is highly unlikely a pretest would convey the serious nature of the topic.
  4. There is no indication a pretest would spark the students’ interest in the topic.

Question 7

Mr. Alberts is an elementary physical education teacher. For an activity, he writes various letters on large poster boards and has his class stand in a line perpendicular to him. He holds up a poster board with a letter and the students think of a way to shape their body to mimic the shape of the letter. This activity is most likely to promote the students’ physical development in which of the following areas?

  1. Muscle memory
  2. Eye-foot coordination
  3. Tactile awareness
  4. Body awareness

Correct Answer:  4

Explanations:

  1. Muscle memory refers to a person repeating a movement over and over until they can perform the activity without conscious effort. Activities like riding a bicycle, typing, or playing a certain melody on a musical instrument are all examples of muscle memory. The students would not be repeating the activity often enough to develop muscle memory.
  2. The children are standing still, so they are not having to coordinate much foot movement with their eyes.
  3. Tactile awareness refers to a person’s sense of feel or touch. The children are not really touching or feeling things, so it would not promote tactile awareness.
  4. This is the best answer as the students would have to think about ways to move and shape their body to mimic the letter.

Question 8

Mr. Hawks, an elementary physical education teacher, designs an activity where he divides the class into three rows. He places one row on the north wall of the gym, the second row on the south wall of the gym, and the third row in the middle of the gym. He instructs the students on the north and south walls to roll balls back and forth and instructs the students in the middle to avoid being hit by a ball and avoid touching other students. This activity is most effective in developing the third-row students’:

  1. Spatial awareness
  2. Balance
  3. Fine motor skills
  4. Hand-eye coordination

Correct Answer:  1

Explanations:

  1. This is the best answer choice. The students in the middle must be aware of their location, the location of all the balls, and the location of the other students. This requires them to have awareness of the space around them.
  2. Although the students have to balance, they are constantly moving so balancing is not the foremost concern.
  3. Fine motor skills are the use and coordination of small muscles within the body, such as moving fingers in coordination with the eyes. The students are moving their entire bodies, not just small muscles.
  4. The students are using their feet in the activity and there is not much hand movement or a requirement to use one’s hands.

Question 9

Mr. Harris is a sixth-grade physical education teacher. During class, Mr. Harris asks Billy to stand up and come to the front of the class. Mr. Harris tells Billy to stand straight up with his feet close together while Mr. Harris gently pushes Billy off-balance. Next, Mr. Harris tells Billy to separate his feet and slightly crouch down. Mr. Harris then uses the same amount of force but is unable to push Billy off-balance. Which of the following is the activity most likely to promote to Mr. Harris’s sixth-grade class?

  1. Changing speed or rhythm effects balance
  2. Raising the center of gravity improves balance
  3. Increasing the body’s base increases stability
  4. Decreasing the load on a muscle group increases balance and stability

Correct Answer:  3

Explanations:

  1. Mr. Harris didn’t change speed or rhythm, he pushed Billy in the same manner.  Billy changed his positioning.
  2. Billy lowered his center of gravity by crouching, which improved his balance.  
  3. Widening the feet increases the base of support for one’s stability. As feet move closer together, the center of gravity becomes higher and decreases support; however, the wider the feet move apart the lower and more centered the center of gravity and the more stable the position.
  4. No significant change to any muscle group’s load occurred in this experiment.

Question 10

According to current research, which of the following best promotes student participation in lifelong physical activity?

  1. Learning how to play a popular sport
  2. Playing on a team that regularly wins
  3. Acquiring the skills needed to participate in a variety of physical activities
  4. Introducing the students to proper exercise forms, such as a proper push-up technique and a proper squatting technique

Correct Answer:  3

Explanations:

  1. Learning how to play a popular sport is not the best way to promote lifelong participation because when a student no longer plays that particular sport, or if the student does not like that particular sport, they may not feel confident to attempt another sport.  
  2. It is unlikely students will always win; students need to learn how to win and lose gracefully.
  3. This is the best answer because research indicates that when students acquire basic skills to participate in a variety of activities, then students are more likely to participate and feel confident in their abilities.
  4. Knowing proper exercise form may not promote lifelong participation in physical activities.

Question 11

Which of the following movements most clearly demonstrates basic non-locomotor body management?

  1. Leaping with variation in distance
  2. Standing on a balance beam
  3. Hopping up and down
  4. Throwing a baseball

Correct Answer:  2

Explanations:

  1. Locomotor skills involve moving the body from one location to another.  Leaping would constitute such an activity.
  2. Non-locomotor body management would be an activity where there is no movement, but body control is required. Standing on a balance beam requires body control and management, but does not require movement.
  3. Locomotor skills involve moving the body from one location to another.  Hopping would constitute such an activity.
  4. Locomotor skills involve moving the body from one location to another.  Moving one’s arm to throw a baseball would constitute such an activity.

Question 12

Asking students to practice throwing and catching a baseball-best promotes which of the following skills?

  1. Fine motor skills
  2. Self-efficacy
  3. Manipulative skills
  4. Rhythmic skills

Correct Answer:  3

Explanations:

  1. Fine motor skills are the coordination of small muscles with the eyes; examples would be handwriting and pencil grip.
  2. Self-efficacy is an individual’s opinion of himself.
  3. Manipulative skills are when a student handles an object with his hands, feet, or another body part. Examples of manipulative skills would be jumping rope, kicking a soccer ball, or throwing a baseball.
  4. Rhythmic skills require a student to perform an action or activity in a rhythmic manner. Examples would be dancing, skipping, or galloping.

Question 13

The potential to achieve mature performance in skipping, sliding and galloping may be evident around the age of:

  1. 3
  2. 5
  3. 6
  4. 7

Correct Answer:  1

Explanations:

  1. At age three, children should be demonstrating the ability to gallop, skip, and slide.
  2. Children should be demonstrating the ability to gallop, skip, and slide before age five.
  3. Children should be demonstrating the ability to gallop, skip, and slide before age six.
  4. Children should be demonstrating the ability to gallop, skip, and slide before age seven.

Question 14

A high schooler’s family is beginning a fitness program that includes bicycling. To begin, the student and the father ride their bike two times a week for thirty minutes. According to the FITT criteria for fitness training, which of the following is an accurate application of the principle of time?

  1. Gradually increasing the sessions five minutes every two weeks
  2. Gradually increasing the number of sessions each week
  3. Gradually increasing the distance of each session
  4. Gradually reducing the amount of time of each session

Correct Answer:  1

Explanations:

  1. FITT (frequency, intensity, time, and type) would suggest gradually increasing the time of the physical activity to build endurance.
  2. Gradually increasing the number of sessions would pertain to the frequency aspect of FITT – (frequency, intensity, time, and type).
  3. Gradually increasing the distance would pertain to the intensity aspect of FITT – (frequency, intensity, time, and type). Because the amount of time in the session would remain 30 minutes – the answer does not say anything about increasing the amount of time – then the father and son would have to exert more energy to go a farther distance in the same amount of time.
  4. Gradually decreasing the amount of time in each session would not promote fitness, as the father and son would do less and less of the physical activity. This would not be promoted by FITT – (frequency, intensity, time, and type).

Question 15

The ability to transfer energy explosively into force is known as:

  1. Coordination
  2. Power
  3. Strength
  4. Speed

Correct Answer:  2

Explanations:

  1. Coordination refers to a person’s ability to manipulate movement.
  2. Power refers to a person’s ability to transfer energy.
  3. Strength refers to a person’s power. Strength is a description of power. It is not the ability to transfer energy.
  4. Speed refers to how quickly a person can move from one point to another.

Question 16

A teacher times students as they run through an obstacle course as pictured. Which of the following skills is the teacher most likely assessing?

  1. Non-locomotor skills
  2. Agility
  3. Power
  4. Balance

Correct Answer:  2

Explanations:

  1. A non-locomotor activity consists of moving body parts, but remaining in the same place. Non-locomotor activities include stretching, twisting, turning, bending, etc. The question prompt clearly indicates that students are running, so students are not performing a non-locomotor activity.
  2. Agility is the ability to move quickly and easily. Running an obstacle course is a good indicator of agility.
  3. Power is one’s capacity to move an object. Running an obstacle course does not measure the power of a student because the student is not moving objects.
  4. Balance is one’s ability to remain upright. An obstacle course will primarily measure one’s agility.

Question 17

Which of the following is true of the electoral process in the United States?

  1. A President must be at least 35 years old at the time of election
  2. A member of the House of Representatives must be at least 35 at the time of election
  3. A citizen must be at least 21 years old to vote
  4. Candidates for election must work at a voting station the day of election

Mr. David wants to help his tenth-grade students set and achieve goals in their physical fitness. Which of the following strategies is most likely to help Mr. David?

  1. Help students analyze their own physical fitness and design a program that meets their interests and enhances their physical fitness
  2. Organize physical education activities that allow students to exert as much energy as they feel comfortable
  3. Create a circuit of physical fitness exercises that allows students to work multiple muscle groups in a single session
  4. Place students into groups of similar physical fitness levels and have them design group activities that meet their fitness needs

Correct Answer:  A

Explanations:

  1. Students need to be aware of their fitness level so they can set appropriate fitness goals. Also, it is important they have a fitness plan, preferably one that pertains to their interests, that outlines clear activities to increase the students’ fitness.
  2. Organizing activities will not contribute to the students to set goals for their physical fitness.
  3. Creating a circuit of exercises will not contribute to the students to set goals for their physical fitness.
  4. Each student is unique and requires an individual workout plan.

Question 18

A teacher has the students perform the following warm-up exercises:

  1. Jumping Jacks
  2. Toe touches and ankle circles
  3. Lunges
  4. Running in place

During the main activity, students learn the basics of passing and receiving a soccer ball.

Which of the following warm-up activities best supports the skills needed for the main activity?

  1. Warm-up activity 1
  2. Warm-up activity 2
  3. Warm-up activity 3
  4. Warm-up activity 4

Correct Answer:  2

Explanations:

  1. Jumping jacks can improve a student’s cardiovascular strength generally, but does not directly aid in the passing of a soccer ball.
  2. Toe touches and ankle circles will best prepare a student for learning the basics of soccer because soccer consists of largely kicking a ball, which involves quick leg moves and ankle agility.
  3. Lunges can improve leg strength and flexibility, which may help a person to play soccer, but are less directly beneficial than toe touches/ankle circles.
  4. Running in place can improve a student’s cardiovascular strength generally, but does not directly aid in the passing of a soccer ball.

Question 19

During anaerobic exercises:

  1. glucose storage is increased.
  2. oxygen flow is increased to the muscle.
  3. muscles are deprived of oxygen.
  4. the primary goal is extended activity.

Correct Answer:  3

Explanations:

  1. Glucose storage is not increased, only the use of glucose is increased in anaerobic exercise.
  2. During anaerobic exercise, muscles use glucose instead of oxygen, because the activity requires more energy than just oxygen can provide.  The flow of oxygen is not improved, the body uses another energy source (glucose).
  3. Anaerobic exercise takes place when muscles use glucose for energy instead of oxygen because the activity requires more energy than just oxygen can provide. Examples of anaerobic exercise include sprinting and weight lifting.
  4. The primary goal for aerobic activity is extended activity, this is not the case for anaerobic exercise. Anaerobic exercises increase muscular strength and can decrease body fat.

Question 20

Which of the following is the best strategy to help students become more flexible?

  1. Start each activity with a warm-up activity and stretching
  2. Start each activity with a short run and jumping jacks
  3. End each activity with sprinting exercises
  4. Incorporate massages into the weekly class schedule

Correct Answer:  1

Explanation: Stretching helps students to become more flexible. Stretching is the best activity to increase students’ flexibility.

Question 21

Which of the following activities would not increase cardiovascular endurance?

  1. Lifting weights
  2. Running in the park
  3. Swimming in a lake
  4. Sitting on the couch

Correct Answer:  4

Explanations:

  1. Weightlifting is an exercise that would increase cardiovascular endurance.
  2. Running in a park is an aerobic exercise that would increase cardiovascular endurance.
  3. Swimming is an aerobic exercise that would increase cardiovascular endurance.
  4. All other activities increase the heart rate and improve cardiovascular endurance. Sitting on the couch is not a physical activity and does not improve cardiovascular endurance.

Question 22

Ms. Sims, a second-grade teacher, has been teaching a unit of safety to her class. She has already taught several lessons on how to stay safe in various situations, steps to prevent accidents, and how to best respond in emergencies. Which of the following would be the best activity to assess the students’ knowledge of the unit?

  1. Ask the local fire department to talk to the class about safety in emergency situations
  2. Stage an emergency for the students to react to
  3. Divide students into groups of 3 and assign each group a unique emergency for which they must design a written plan of action
  4. Show a video on emergency situations for students

Correct Answer:  3

Explanations:

  1. Asking the local fire department to come to talk does not allow the students to demonstrate their knowledge.
  2. First, this would only allow students to demonstrate their response in one emergency situation. Second, it is not a good idea to place students in an emergency situation as students might be hurt.
  3. This is the best answer option as students would be able to fully articulate their knowledge on the best plan of action for a specific situation. The teacher can then review the plan of actions and discuss the groups’ responses.
  4. Showing a video does not allow the students to demonstrate their knowledge.

Question 23

Which of the following would be the best strategy to promote safety awareness in a variety of situations?

  1. Listing common, scary situations students experience and how best to respond to the situations
  2. Discussing different ways to communicate in relationships
  3. Practicing responding to difficult situations by role-playing responses
  4. Brainstorming a list of techniques to cope with difficult situations

Correct Answer:  3

Explanations:

  1. Listing situations does not allow students to exercise decision-making skills. It is also impossible to list every potential dangerous scenario a student may face. Instruction should try to encourage and promote good decision-making with students.
  2. Discussing ways to communicate in relationships does not promote safety awareness.
  3. Role-playing responses to difficult situations is the best answer because it allows students to exercise decision-making skills. Students best learn how to handle a variety of situations by practicing good decision-making in role-playing environments.
  4. Brainstorming does not allow students to exercise decision-making skills. It is also impossible to list every potential dangerous scenario a student may face. Instruction should try to encourage and promote good decision-making with students.

Question 24

Which of the following strategies should a physical education teacher utilize to promote a sense of fairness and sportsmanship among students during physical activities?

  1. Encouraging all students that they are great at whichever game is currently being played
  2. Not declaring winners or losers by a defined score
  3. Encouraging supportive behaviors and attitudes among teammates and competitors
  4. Reciting a team chant before beginning athletic activities

Correct Answer:  3

Explanations:

  1. Not all students will be great at every game or activity they play. Promoting a false sense of mastery in an activity is not appropriate for a physical education teacher.
  2. Not keeping score or declaring a winner does not necessarily reduce the competition between students.
  3. Actively encouraging supportive behaviors and good sportsmanship is the best strategy to promote fairness and sportsmanship during physical activities. Socially rewarding positive behaviors is a key factor in promoting those behaviors.
  4. Reciting a team chant can promote team unity, but it is not the best option to encourage fairness and sportsmanship of the answer options.

Question 25

A physical education teacher is planning activities for his class that contains three students with disabilities. To best implement the planned activities with the fewest amount of restrictions, which of the following should be the primary goal of the teacher?

  1. Create activities that allow each student to engage in his own individual strengths
  2. Group the three students on their own team or activity
  3. Ask the three students to referee and help coach the activity
  4. Have the three students spend time after-class practicing the activity

Correct Answer:  1

Explanations:

  1. Physical education teachers should gear activities and skill development to best help all students in mainstream instruction. It is the goal of the teacher to design activities that allow each student to be successful in skill development and participation.
  2. Grouping the three students together fails to integrate them in any meaningful way.
  3. Excluding the three students and placing them in a non-participatory capacity does not encourage their success in skills development and participation.
  4. By making the students participate in a wholly separate activity and forcing them to spend extra time, the teacher fails to integrate them in any meaningful way.
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