Praxis Physical Education: Content Knowledge Ultimate Guide2019-07-23T20:29:15+00:00

Praxis Physical Education: Content Knowledge: Ultimate Guide and Practice Test

Preparing to take the Praxis Physical Education: Content Knowledge exam?

Awesome!

You’ve found the right page. We will answer every question you have and tell you exactly what you need to study to pass the Praxis Physical Education: Content Knowledge exam.

Praxis Physical Education: Content Knowledge Quick Facts

The Praxis Physical Education: Content Knowledge exam is used in multiple states as a requirement to teach physical education in public schools grades K-12. It is designed to measure the knowledge necessary to teach physical education.

The Praxis PE exam is a computer-based test that includes 120 multiple choice questions to be answered within a 2 hour time window. Each section is worth a different percentage of the examination. The four sections are listed below:

  • Content Knowledge and Student Growth Development
    • 36 questions
    • 30% of exam
  • Management, Motivation, and Communication
    • 30 questions
    • 25% of exam
  • Planning, Instruction, and Student Assessment
    • 30 questions
    • 25% of exam
  • Collaboration, Reflection, and Technology
    • 24 questions
    • 20% of exam

Cost:

The cost to take the exam is $120. Registration fees can be paid using a credit or debit card, money order, bank check drawn in the United States, Paypal, or an eCheck.

Scoring:

The minimum passing score for the Praxis PE exam varies by state. Check out the chart below for the passing score needed in your state.

Study time:

Ok, so you know what the test covers. How do you prepare to do your best? The amount of study time depends on many factors. One key to success is to assess what you already know. Then, allot study time to the topics in which you are not as confident.

What test takers wish they would’ve known:

  • Guess if you do not know the answer. There is no penalty or subtraction for an incorrect answer. The final score is based on the number of correct answers.
  • Skip the questions you find extremely difficult. Focus on the questions you can confidently answer, then come back to the others.
  • Read all of the answers before choosing one. Be careful to understand what is being asked.
  • Eliminate the weakest answer choices first.

Information and screenshots obtained from the ETS Praxis website: https://www.ets.org/praxis/prepare/materials/5091

Content Knowledge and Student Growth and Development

Overview

This content category has 36 selected-response questions. These questions account for 30% of the entire exam.

This content category can be neatly divided into 2 sections:

  • Core Concepts
  • Student Growth and Development

So, let’s talk about Core Concepts first.

Core Concepts

This section tests your knowledge of core concepts, such as motor skills, kinesiology, anatomy, and physiology. You will also need to know about a variety of activities and games appropriate for grade K-12 and how to use equipment properly.

Let’s talk about some concepts that you will more than likely see on the test.

Gross Motor Development

Gross motor skills involve large muscle groups that we use daily. These skills involve the coordination of muscles and the neurological system. Although most of these skills come automatically, they are very complex. Children hit gross motor milestones as they develop. For example, a three or four year old typically can jump and land on two feet, while a seven or eight year old has enough balance to ride a bike with no training wheels. These milestones are hit in sequence. There are many examples of “typical” milestones for different age groups. Check out this chart to see a complete list of milestones: https://www.chrichmond.org/Resource-Library/Gross-Motor-Skills-Birth-to-5-years.htm

Skill-Related Fitness

The six components of skill-related fitness are agility, balance, coordination, power, reaction time, and speed.

Agility is the ability of the body to change direction quickly while keeping control. Examples of activities that require agility include:

  • Football
  • Basketball
  • Soccer
  • Tennis

Balance is the ability for the body to maintain an upright posture when still or in motion. Examples of activities that require balance include:

  • Yoga
  • Pilates
  • Gymnastics  

Coordination is the ability of the body to use hand and foot movements with the input of our senses. Examples of activities that require coordination include:

  • Crossfit
  • Golf
  • Jumping Rope

Power is the ability of the body to perform strength work at an explosive speed. Examples of activities that require power include:

  • Olympic Lifts
  • Plyometrics
  • Track and Field  

Reaction Time is the amount of time it takes for the body to react to a stimulus, such as a starting gun or movement of the opponent. Examples of activities that require reaction time include:

  • Racquet Sports
  • Martial Arts
  • Cricket

Speed is the ability of the body to move quickly from one point to another. Examples of activities that require speed include:

  • Sprinting
  • Speed Skating
  • Swimming

Student Growth and Development

This section tests your knowledge of designing effective and appropriate physical education activities based on developmental stages and individual student needs.

Here are some concepts you should know.

Affective Domain

The affective domain is comprised of attitudes, values, and emotions. The components that make up this domain include receiving, responding, valuing, organization, and characterization.

  • Receiving– Openness to new information or experiences
  • Responding– Active participation in new information or experiences  
  • Valuing– Attaching value to new information or experiences
  • Organization– Incorporating new information or experiences into a pre-existing value system
  • Characterization– Full integration of new information or experiences resulting in new attitudes, beliefs, and/or behaviors

The affective domain is often applied in the physical education setting because students are often earning new sports, activities, and concepts. Below are some physical education activities that involve the affective domain.

Line Boogie (K-2)

  • Students line up in groups and move a beanbag from one end of the line to the other without letting it hit the floor.
  • Use of Affective Domain: Students must pay close attention to others’ movements to prevent the beanbag from dropping.

Tic-Tac-Toe Relay (3-5)

  • Students are in groups. One person races to the board to put their marker down, coming back to tag one of their teammates that sends them to the board to put their marker down. This pattern continues. The objective is to get a line before their opponent does.
  • Use of Affective Domain: Students must race down and think about where to put their marker in order to block their opponent from winning.

Moving Tower Push Ups (Middle Grades)

  • Teams must rebuild a tower by moving one piece at a time while running to the designated area to complete one push-up to the best of their ability.
  • Use of Affective Domain: Students challenge themselves to race down to complete their push up, tolerate pain when completing the push up, and persevere despite difficulty.

Wacky Walks Heart Rate Monitoring (High School)

  • Students learn to take their resting and active heart rate. They complete a series of different exercises like walking, lunges, jumping jacks, etc. to determine their active heart rate. They then do push-ups or triceps dips to target a different muscle group and record their heart rate.
  • Use of Affective Domain: Students understand the importance of exercise and what movements will best increase their heart rate.

Check out this website for the other domains used in these different activities:

https://www.advancementcourses.com/blog/pe-activities-to-engage-students

Experiential Readiness

Experiential readiness is how background knowledge, prior learning, experiences, and level of aspiration affect a student’s readiness to learn. The disparities in readiness can be great when comparing students. For example, some students come into kindergarten knowing all the letters of the alphabet, while others don’t know a single letter. These disparities can also be present in the physical education classroom and can affect a child’s ability. For example, a child may play sports for different recreational leagues outside of school while another child in the same class is not allowed to play outside. As a result, teachers need to mix content with the process of student learning. There should be a balance between experiential activities and content with no judgment while the students explore in a safe place.

Management, Motivation, and Communication

Overview

This content category has 30 selected-response questions. These questions account for 25% of the entire exam.

This content category can be neatly divided into 2 sections:

  • Management and Motivation
  • Communication

So, let’s talk about Management and Motivation first.

Management and Motivation

This section tests your knowledge of effective behavior management and increasing motivation in the physical education environment.

Let’s talk about some concepts that you will more than likely see on the test.

Establishing Effective Classroom Management

Teachers must establish positive and effective classroom management beginning the first day of school because expectations must be clear from the start. Directly teaching students how to perform expectations is imperative. For example, if children are to quietly walk and line up at the end of class, students should practice before it is actually time to do so. If students are expected to start jogging laps as soon as they enter the gym, then they must be explicitly taught this. They need to know how they should be running, how fast they should run, how to pass another classmate, etc. This will prevent injuries from occurring, as well as set clear expectations from day one. Check out the link for positive classroom management ideas specifically for the physical education classroom. https://www.thepespecialist.com/classroommanagement/

Behavior Management Plans

A behavior management plan is a written plan of action for a child who struggles to participate appropriately in the learning process. Its purpose is to help that child succeed and limit the frequency of problematic behaviors. The plan is part of a child’s individualized education plan (IEP) developed by a team of educators and behavior specialists.  

Communication

This section tests your knowledge of communicating respectfully and providing effective feedback to enhance students’ performance.

Check out these concepts.

Nonverbal Communication

Nonverbal communication is a way to communicate without words, using facial expressions, gestures, and postures. Examples include giving a student a thumbs up when they do a good job, raising your eyebrows when a student is not doing what they are supposed to be doing, and making eye contact with a student who needs to modify his or her behavior to meet expectations. Nonverbal communication used in the classroom promotes a positive learning environment because a child can be praised and/or corrected without anyone else knowing.

Instructional Feedback

Instructional feedback is a strategy that a teacher uses to clarify misinformation, confirm misunderstandings, and fine-tune understandings. Students thrive when given positive specific feedback. The two major types of feedback given in a physical education classroom are descriptive (general) and prescriptive (specific).

Examples of descriptive feedback:

  • Good job!
  • Way to go!
  • You can do it!

Examples of descriptive feedback:

  • Turn sideways
  • Follow through
  • Use the instep, not the toe, to kick

Planning, Instruction, and Student Assessment

Overview

This content category has 30 selected-response questions. These questions account for 25% of the entire exam.

This content category can be neatly divided into 2 sections:

  • Planning and Instruction
  • Student Assessment

So, let’s start with Planning and Instruction.

Planning and Instruction

This section tests your knowledge of planning developmentally appropriate physical education experiences based on standards. You should also know how to instruct students through explanations, demonstrations, and cues to help them achieve success with the activity.

Here are some concepts you need to know.

Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation often referred to as CPR, is a medical procedure that requires repeated chest compressions to restore blood circulation and breathing to a person who has suffered cardiac arrest. Check out the link on how to perform CPR: https://www.profirstaid.com/training_video/adult-cpr-profa

Student Assessment

This section tests your knowledge of designing and implementing appropriate assessments to accurately measure students’ growth and progress in physical education.

Let’s talk about some concepts that you will more than likely see on the test.

President’s Challenge

The President’s Challenge is a physical activity and fitness program aimed to encourage all Americans to make physical activity part of their everyday life. Through a variety of tests, the program provides tools and resources to motivate youth and adults to live healthy lives.

The Health Fitness Test includes:

  • Partial Curl-Ups
  • One Mile Run/Walk
  • Sit and Reach
  • Right Angle Push-Ups or Pull-Ups or Flexed-Arm Hang
  • Body Mass Index

The Physical Fitness Test includes:

  • Curl-Ups or Partial Curl-Ups
  • Shuttle Run
  • Endurance Run/Walk
  • Pull-Ups or Right Angle Push-Ups or Flexed-Arm Hang
  • Sit and Reach

Formative versus Summative Assessments

Formative assessments are for learning while summative assessments are of learning. Formative assessments are given throughout a lesson to determine how well students understand new concepts and skills. Summative assessments are given at the end of the unit to assess students’ total knowledge of a learning target.

Examples of Formative Assessments include:

  • Exit Ticket
  • Running Records
  • Thumbs Up, Down, or Middle
  • Think-Pair-Share

Examples of Summative Assessments include:

  • State Assessments
  • End of Unit Assessments
  • Chapter Tests
  • District Benchmarks

Collaboration, Reflection, and Technology

Overview

This content category has 24 selected-response questions. These questions account for 20% of the entire exam.

This content category can be neatly divided into 3 sections:

  • Collaboration
  • Reflection
  • Technology

So, let’s start with Collaboration.

Collaboration

This section tests your knowledge of collaborating with colleagues, families, and the community to improve the quality of students’ physical education.

Check out these important concepts.

Physical Education and Mathematics

Integrating Mathematics into Physical Education Classrooms:

Telling Time

  • Students can use a stopwatch to time others completing certain activities
  • With these times students can:
    • Subtract to find the difference
    • Order times from least to greatest or greatest to least
    • Find the mean, median, and mode of every student in a class

Geometry

  • Students can describe different shapes found in different activities
    • Basketball court
    • Tennis court
    • Bowling

Measurement

  • Students can compare different weights of equipment balls
  • Students can measure lengths of long jump or softball throw

Data

  • Place scores in variety of graphs for a variety of sports and compare data
    • Frequency table
    • Bar graph
    • Dot plot

Community Collaboration

Ways to promote collaboration with the community:

Organize a race

  • Allow anyone in the community to register
  • Reach out to businesses for donations

Organize a competition

  • Have a tournament where a variety of teams compete against each other (i.e. teacher team, administration team, business team)

Invite Community Members to Speak to Students

  • Have health professionals speak to students about the importance of physical activity and nutrition (i.e. doctors, nutritionists, personal trainers)

Reflection

This section tests your knowledge of reflection as a tool to grow as an educator.

Let’s talk about a concept that you will more than likely see on the test.

Reflective Cycle

The reflective cycle is a systematic approach to your thoughts in regards to a specific event, situation, or activity. The cycle includes six steps: description, feelings, evaluation, analysis, conclusion, and action plan. The reflective cycle can be used to reflect on teacher performance, student learning, and instructional goals. Asking yourself some of the following questions can help you implement the reflective cycle within your teaching:

Description

  • What did you teach?
  • How did you teach it?
  • What was the student success rate after you taught this?

Feelings

  • How did you feeling before, during, after the lesson?
  • How did the students feel about your lesson?

Evaluation

  • What went well during the lesson? Why did it go well?
  • What didn’t go well during the lesson? Why did it not go well?

Analysis

  • What will you change for next time?
  • What will you keep the same?

Conclusion

  • Did the lesson lead to positive student success?
  • Did the lesson lead to student failure?
  • What skills do students need before teaching this lesson?

Action Plan

  • Do I need to re-teach?
  • Can we move on?

Technology

This section tests your knowledge of using technology effectively in a physical education setting.

This concept may appear on the test.

Technology in the Physical Education Classroom

Technology Prevalent in Physical Education Classroom:

  • Pedometers– track steps
  • Heart Rate Monitor– track heart rate
  • Video Resources– teach yoga and dance
  • Smart Watches– track progress over time
  • Gaming Systems– interactive video games
  • Physical Education Apps– Examples: Remind, Team Shake, Sworkit, and FIT Radio

And that’s some basic info about the exam.

Practice Questions and Answers

Question 1

Which of the following is NOT a benefit of exercise?

  1. Higher fat insulation and storage
  2. Increased blood flow to muscles
  3. Improved cardiovascular health
  4. Higher daily caloric consumption

Correct Answer:  1

Explanation: Higher fat levels result in increased insulation and fat storage. Exercise will typically reduce fat storage.

Question 2

Which of the following best describes an average four-year-old’s ability to walk?

  1. Their walking is choppy and uncoordinated
  2. Their walking is automatic and has an adult style
  3. Their walking is characterized by large, high steps and they tend to have one foot firmly on the ground
  4. Their walking still needs to be stabilized by an adult

Correct Answer:  2

Explanation: This is the best answer. By age four, a child’s walking ability should be fluid and mimic the walking style of an adult. All other answer choices describe an infant’s walking style.

Question 3

Which of the following best describes the purpose of a health education program in a school?

  1. To protect the health of the student body
  2. To educate students on how to make healthy choices
  3. To facilitate the education on topics such as sex, vaccinations, and abuse
  4. To meet state-required educational goals

Correct Answer:  2

Explanations:

  1. The purpose of the health program is not to protect the health of the student body, but to educate and emphasize the importance of making healthy decisions. The school is not logistically able to completely protect the health of the student body.
  2. The purpose of health education programs is to equip students to make healthy decisions in all aspects of their lives. The way health education programs do this is by highlighting the consequences of unhealthy decisions and discussing how to decide what decision is the best option; this is accomplished by educating the students on various topics.
  3. Facilitating education on relevant topics is how the purpose of the health education program is accomplished. The purpose is to encourage students to make healthy decisions through education; the purpose is not solely education.
  4. Meeting state goals might be the cause of a health education program, but it is not the purpose.

Question 4

In schools across the United States, there has been an increased awareness of health and fitness related issues, especially regarding proper diet and nutrition for adolescents. Which of the following has this increased awareness led to?

  1. An increased emphasis on promoting individuals’ lifelong participation in physical activity and exercises
  2. An increased emphasis on traditional physical activities in physical education classes
  3. A widespread belief that physical education and nutrition knowledge should be incorporated into standardized testing
  4. An increase in the number of time students are required to spend each day in physical education classes

Correct Answer:  1

Explanations:

  1. This is the best answer. As obesity among adolescents in increasing and the desire for children to have a greater knowledge of exercise and nutrition, physical education classes are trying to promoting lifelong participation in physical activities. This has led to a decrease in traditional P.E. exercises and an increase in more “fun” physical activities to show kids that physical activity can be enjoyable.
  2. As obesity among adolescents is increasing and more of a desire for children to have a greater knowledge of exercise and nutrition, physical education classes are trying to promoting lifelong participation in physical activities. This has led to a decrease in traditional P.E. exercises and an increase in more “fun” physical activities to show kids that physical activity can be enjoyable.
  3. Standardized testing for physical education and nutrition knowledge is not a widespread belief.
  4. There has not been a widespread increase in the amount of time required by students to spend in P.E. classes.

Question 5

Carbohydrates are most useful for the:

  1. conversion of starches and sugars to glucose.
  2. the building of muscle.
  3. absorption of nutrients by cells.
  4. replenishing stomach lining.

Correct Answer:  1

Explanations:

  1. This is the main use of carbohydrates.
  2. Building muscle is the main use of proteins.
  3. Fats help in the absorption of nutrients.
  4. The stomach lining replenishes itself. Carbohydrates do not play a direct role.

Question 6

Mrs. Gruntle is planning a health unit on substance abuse. Before beginning the unit, Mrs. Gruntle prepares a pretest to give the students. Which of the following is the most important advantage of the pretest?

  1. The pretest will encourage students to investigate what misconceptions they have about substance abuse
  2. The pretest will help Mrs. Gruntle recognize misconceptions students have about substance abuse
  3. The pretest will alert students to the serious nature of the unit topic
  4. The pretest will increase the students’ desire to learn about substance abuse

Correct Answer:  2

Explanations:

  1. The pretest will not encourage students to investigate any misconceptions they might have because it is not clear if the students will receive feedback on the exam. Without feedback, the students are not aware they have misconceptions about substance abuse.
  2. Many students develop misconceptions about substance abuse. To best educate the students on the effects of substance abuse, Mrs. Gruntle will need to know what misconceptions the students have, so they can be adequately addressed. The pretest will allow Mrs. Gruntle to identify various misconceptions the students have and this will allow her to develop instructional activities to correct misconceptions and develop a correct view of substance abuse among her students.
  3. Pretests are common in education to create a benchmark of student knowledge and identify weak areas. Because they are common, it is highly unlikely a pretest would convey the serious nature of the topic.
  4. There is no indication a pretest would spark the students’ interest in the topic.

Question 7

Mr. Alberts is an elementary physical education teacher. For an activity, he writes various letters on large poster boards and has his class stand in a line perpendicular to him. He holds up a poster board with a letter and the students think of a way to shape their body to mimic the shape of the letter. This activity is most likely to promote the students’ physical development in which of the following areas?

  1. Muscle memory
  2. Eye-foot coordination
  3. Tactile awareness
  4. Body awareness

Correct Answer:  4

Explanations:

  1. Muscle memory refers to a person repeating a movement over and over until they can perform the activity without conscious effort. Activities, like riding a bicycle, typing, or playing a certain melody on a musical instrument, are all examples of muscle memory. The students would not be repeating the activity often enough to develop muscle memory.
  2. The children are standing still, so they are not having to coordinate much foot movement with their eyes.
  3. Tactile awareness refers to a person’s sense of feel or touch. The children are not really touching or feeling things, so it would not promote tactile awareness.
  4. This is the best answer as the students would have to think about ways to move and shape their body to mimic the letter.

Question 8

Mr. Hawks, an elementary physical education teacher, designs an activity where he divides the class into three rows. He places one row on the north wall of the gym, the second row on the south wall of the gym, and the third row in the middle of the gym. He instructs the students on the north and south walls to roll balls back and forth and instructs the students in the middle to avoid being hit by a ball and avoid touching other students. This activity is most effective in developing the third-row students’:

  1. Spatial awareness
  2. Balance
  3. Fine motor skills
  4. Hand-eye coordination

Correct Answer:  1

Explanations:

  1. This is the best answer choice. The students in the middle must be aware of their location, the location of all the balls, and the location of the other students. This requires them to have awareness of the space around them.
  2. Although the students have to balance, they are constantly moving so balancing is not the foremost concern.
  3. Fine motor skills are the use and coordination of small muscles within the body, such as moving fingers in coordination with the eyes. The students are moving their entire bodies, not just small muscles.
  4. The students are using their feet in the activity and there is not much hand movement or a requirement to use one’s hands.

Question 9

Mr. Harris is a sixth-grade physical education teacher. During class, Mr. Harris asks Billy to stand up and come to the front of the class. Mr. Harris tells Billy to stand straight up with his feet close together while Mr. Harris gently pushes Billy off-balance. Next, Mr. Harris tells Billy to separate his feet and slightly crouch down. Mr. Harris then uses the same amount of force but is unable to push Billy off-balance. Which of the following is the activity most likely to promote to Mr. Harris’s sixth-grade class?

  1. Changing speed or rhythm effects balance
  2. Raising the center of gravity improves balance
  3. Increasing the body’s base increases stability
  4. Decreasing the load on a muscle group increases balance and stability

Correct Answer:  3

Explanations:

  1. Mr. Harris didn’t change speed or rhythm, he pushed Billy in the same manner.  Billy changed his positioning.
  2. Billy lowered his center of gravity by crouching, which improved his balance.  
  3. Widening the feet increases the base of support for one’s stability. As feet move closer together, the center of gravity becomes higher and decreases support; however, the wider the feet move apart the lower and more centered the center of gravity and the more stable the position.
  4. No significant change to any muscle group’s load occurred in this experiment.

Question 10

According to current research, which of the following best promotes student participation in lifelong physical activity?

  1. Learning how to play a popular sport
  2. Playing on a team that regularly wins
  3. Acquiring the skills needed to participate in a variety of physical activities
  4. Introducing the students to proper exercise forms, such as a proper push-up technique and a proper squatting technique

Correct Answer:  3

Explanations:

  1. Learning how to play a popular sport is not the best way to promote lifelong participation because when a student no longer plays that particular sport, or if the student does not like that particular sport, they may not feel confident to attempt another sport.  
  2. It is unlikely students will always win; students need to learn how to win and lose gracefully.
  3. This is the best answer because research indicates that when students acquire basic skills to participate in a variety of activities, then students are more likely to participate and feel confident in their abilities.
  4. Knowing proper exercise form may not promote lifelong participation in physical activities.

Question 11

Which of the following movements most clearly demonstrates basic non-locomotor body management?

  1. Leaping with variation in distance
  2. Standing on a balance beam
  3. Hopping up and down
  4. Throwing a baseball

Correct Answer:  2

Explanations:

  1. Locomotor skills involve moving the body from one location to another.  Leaping would constitute such an activity.
  2. Non-locomotor body management would be an activity where there is no movement, but body control is required. Standing on a balance beam requires body control and management, but does not require movement.
  3. Locomotor skills involve moving the body from one location to another.  Hopping would constitute such an activity.
  4. Locomotor skills involve moving the body from one location to another.  Moving one’s arm to throw a baseball would constitute such an activity.

Question 12

Asking students to practice throwing and catching a baseball-best promotes which of the following skills?

  1. Fine motor skills
  2. Self-efficacy
  3. Manipulative skills
  4. Rhythmic skills

Correct Answer:  3

Explanations:

  1. Fine motor skills are the coordination of small muscles with the eyes; examples would be handwriting and pencil grip.
  2. Self-efficacy is an individual’s opinion of himself.
  3. Manipulative skills are when a student handles an object with his hands, feet, or another body part. Examples of manipulative skills would be jumping rope, kicking a soccer ball, or throwing a baseball.
  4. Rhythmic skills require a student to perform an action or activity in a rhythmic manner. Examples would be dancing, skipping, or galloping.

Question 13

The potential to achieve mature performance in skipping, sliding and galloping may be evident around the age of:

  1. 3
  2. 5
  3. 6
  4. 7

Correct Answer:  1

Explanations:

  1. At age three, children should be demonstrating the ability to gallop, skip, and slide.
  2. Children should be demonstrating the ability to gallop, skip, and slide before age five.
  3. Children should be demonstrating the ability to gallop, skip, and slide before age six.
  4. Children should be demonstrating the ability to gallop, skip, and slide before age seven.

Question 14

A high schooler’s family is beginning a fitness program that includes bicycling. To begin, the student and the father ride their bike two times a week for thirty minutes. According to the FITT criteria for fitness training, which of the following is an accurate application of the principle of time?

  1. Gradually increasing the sessions five minutes every two weeks
  2. Gradually increasing the number of sessions each week
  3. Gradually increasing the distance of each session
  4. Gradually reducing the amount of time of each session

Correct Answer:  1

Explanations:

  1. FITT (frequency, intensity, time, and type) would suggest gradually increasing the time of the physical activity to build endurance.
  2. Gradually increasing the number of sessions would pertain to the frequency aspect of FITT – (frequency, intensity, time, and type).
  3. Gradually increasing the distance would pertain to the intensity aspect of FITT – (frequency, intensity, time, and type). Because the amount of time in the session would remain 30 minutes – the answer does not say anything about increasing the amount of time – then the father and son would have to exert more energy to go a farther distance in the same amount of time.
  4. Gradually decreasing the amount of time in each session would not promote fitness, as the father and son would do less and less of the physical activity. This would not be promoted by FITT – (frequency, intensity, time, and type).

Question 15

The ability to transfer energy explosively into force is known as:

  1. Coordination
  2. Power
  3. Strength
  4. Speed

Correct Answer:  2

Explanations:

  1. Coordination refers to a person’s ability to manipulate movement.
  2. Power refers to a person’s ability to transfer energy.
  3. Strength refers to a person’s power. Strength is a description of power. It is not the ability to transfer energy.
  4. Speed refers to how quickly a person can move from one point to another.

Question 16

A teacher times students as they run through an obstacle course as pictured. Which of the following skills is the teacher most likely assessing?

  1. Non-locomotor skills
  2. Agility
  3. Power
  4. Balance

Correct Answer:  2

Explanations:

  1. A non-locomotor activity consists of moving body parts, but remaining in the same place. Non-locomotor activities include stretching, twisting, turning, bending, etc. The question prompt clearly indicates that students are running, so students are not performing a non-locomotor activity.
  2. Agility is the ability to move quickly and easily. Running an obstacle course is a good indicator of agility.
  3. Power is one’s capacity to move an object. Running an obstacle course does not measure the power of a student because the student is not moving objects.
  4. Balance is one’s ability to remain upright. An obstacle course will primarily measure one’s agility.

Question 17

Mr. David wants to help his tenth-grade students set and achieve goals in their physical fitness. Which of the following strategies is most likely to help Mr. David?

  1. Help students analyze their own physical fitness and design a program that meets their interests and enhances their physical fitness
  2. Organize physical education activities that allow students to exert as much energy as they feel comfortable
  3. Create a circuit of physical fitness exercises that allow students to work multiple muscle groups in a single session
  4. Place students into groups of similar physical fitness levels and have them design group activities that meet their fitness needs

Correct Answer:  1

Explanations:

  1. Students need to be aware of their fitness level so they can set appropriate fitness goals. Also, it is important they have a fitness plan, preferably one that pertains to their interests, that outlines clear activities to increase the students’ fitness.
  2. Organizing activities will not contribute to the students setting goals for their physical fitness.
  3. Creating a circuit of exercises will not contribute to the students setting goals for their physical fitness.
  4. Each student is unique and requires an individual workout plan.

Question 18

A teacher has the students perform the following warm-up exercises:

  1. Jumping Jacks
  2. Toe touches and ankle circles
  3. Lunges
  4. Running in place

During the main activity, students learn the basics of passing and receiving a soccer ball.

Which of the following warm-up activities best supports the skills needed for the main activity?

  1. Warm-up activity 1
  2. Warm-up activity 2
  3. Warm-up activity 3
  4. Warm-up activity 4

Correct Answer:  2

Explanations:

  1. Jumping jacks can improve a student’s cardiovascular strength generally, but does not directly aid in the passing of a soccer ball.
  2. Toe touches and ankle circles will best prepare a student for learning the basics of soccer because soccer consists of largely kicking a ball, which involves quick leg moves and ankle agility.
  3. Lunges can improve leg strength and flexibility, which may help a person to play soccer, but are less directly beneficial than toe touches/ankle circles.
  4. Running in place can improve a student’s cardiovascular strength generally, but does not directly aid in the passing of a soccer ball.

Question 19

During anaerobic exercises:

  1. muscles are deprived of oxygen.
  2. oxygen flow is increased to the muscle.
  3. glucose storage is increased.
  4. the primary goal is extended activity.

Correct Answer:  1

Explanations:

  1. Anaerobic exercise takes place when muscles use glucose for energy instead of oxygen because the activity requires more energy than just oxygen can provide. Examples of anaerobic exercise include sprinting and weight lifting.
  2. During anaerobic exercise, muscles use glucose instead of oxygen, because the activity requires more energy than just oxygen can provide.  The flow of oxygen is not improved, the body uses another energy source (glucose).
  3. Glucose storage is not increased, only the use of glucose is increased in anaerobic exercise.
  4. The primary goal for aerobic activity is extended activity, this is not the case for anaerobic exercise. Anaerobic exercises increase muscular strength and can decrease body fat.

Question 20

Which of the following is the best strategy to help students become more flexible?

  1. Incorporate massages into the weekly class schedule
  2. Start each activity with a short run and jumping jacks
  3. End each activity with sprinting exercises
  4. Start each activity with a warm-up activity and stretching

Correct Answer:  4

Explanation: Stretching helps students to become more flexible. Stretching is the best activity to increase students’ flexibility.

Question 21

Which of the following activities would not increase cardiovascular endurance?

  1. Sitting on the couch
  2. Running in the park
  3. Swimming in a lake
  4. Lifting weights

Correct Answer:  1

Explanations:

  1. All other activities increase the heart rate and improve cardiovascular endurance. Sitting on the couch is not a physical activity and does not improve cardiovascular endurance.
  2. Running in a park is an aerobic exercise that would increase cardiovascular endurance.
  3. Swimming is an aerobic exercise that would increase cardiovascular endurance.
  4. Weightlifting is an exercise that would increase cardiovascular endurance.

Question 22

Ms. Sims, a second-grade teacher, has been teaching a unit of safety to her class. She has already taught several lessons on how to stay safe in various situations, steps to prevent accidents, and how to best respond in emergencies. Which of the following would be the best activity to assess the students’ knowledge of the unit?

  1. Ask the local fire department to talk to the class about safety in emergency situations
  2. Stage an emergency for the students to react to
  3. Divide students into groups of 3 and assign each group a unique emergency for which they must design a written plan of action
  4. Show a video on emergency situations for students

Correct Answer:  3

Explanations:

  1. Asking the local fire department to come to talk does not allow the students to demonstrate their knowledge.
  2. First, this would only allow students to demonstrate their response in one emergency situation. Second, it is not a good idea to place students in an emergency situation as students might be hurt.
  3. This is the best answer option as students would be able to fully articulate their knowledge on the best plan of action for a specific situation. The teacher can then review the plan of actions and discuss the groups’ responses.
  4. Showing a video does not allow the students to demonstrate their knowledge.

Question 23

Which of the following would be the best strategy to promote safety awareness in a variety of situations?

  1. Listing common, scary situations students experience and how best to respond to the situations
  2. Discussing different ways to communicate in relationships
  3. Practicing responding to difficult situations by role-playing responses
  4. Brainstorming a list of techniques to cope with difficult situations

Correct Answer:  3

Explanations:

  1. Listing situations do not allow students to exercise decision-making skills. It is also impossible to list every potential dangerous scenario a student may face. Instruction should try to encourage and promote good decision-making with students.
  2. Discussing ways to communicate in relationships does not promote safety awareness.
  3. Role-playing responses to difficult situations is the best answer because it allows students to exercise decision-making skills. Students best learn how to handle a variety of situations by practicing good decision-making in role-playing environments.
  4. Brainstorming does not allow students to exercise decision-making skills. It is also impossible to list every potential dangerous scenario a student may face. Instruction should try to encourage and promote good decision-making with students.

Question 24

Which of the following strategies should a physical education teacher utilize to promote a sense of fairness and sportsmanship among students during physical activities?

  1. Encouraging all students that they are great at whichever game is currently being played
  2. Not declaring winners or losers by a defined score
  3. Encouraging supportive behaviors and attitudes among teammates and competitors
  4. Reciting a team chant before beginning athletic activities

Correct Answer:  3

Explanations:

  1. Not all students will be great at every game or activity they play. Promoting a false sense of mastery in an activity is not appropriate for a physical education teacher.
  2. Not keeping score or declaring a winner does not necessarily reduce the competition between students.
  3. Actively encouraging supportive behaviors and good sportsmanship is the best strategy to promote fairness and sportsmanship during physical activities. Socially rewarding positive behaviors is a key factor in promoting those behaviors.
  4. Reciting a team chant can promote team unity, but it is not the best option to encourage fairness and sportsmanship of the answer options.

Question 25

A physical education teacher is planning activities for his class that contains three students with disabilities. To best implement the planned activities with the fewest amount of restrictions, which of the following should be the primary goal of the teacher?

  1. Create activities that allow each student to engage in his own individual strengths
  2. Group the three students on their own team or activity
  3. Ask the three students to referee and help coach the activity
  4. Have the three students spend time after-class practicing the activity

Correct Answer:  1

Explanations:

  1. Physical education teachers should gear activities and skill development to best help all students in mainstream instruction. It is the goal of the teacher to design activities that allow each student to be successful in skill development and participation.
  2. Grouping the three students together fails to integrate them in any meaningful way.
  3. Excluding the three students and placing them in a non-participatory capacity does not encourage their success in skills development and participation.
  4. By making the students participate in a wholly separate activity and forcing them to spend extra time, the teacher fails to integrate them in any meaningful way.
Select to Login
[001]
[001]
[002]
[002]