CPACE-Content Ultimate Guide2019-03-27T19:19:44+00:00

CPACE-Content: Ultimate Guide and Practice Test

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FTCE CPACE-Content

Quick Facts 

Visionary Leadership

Instructional Leadership

School Improvement Leadership

Professional Learning and Growth Leadership

Organizational and Systems Leadership

Community Leadership

Focused Written Assignments

Practice Questions and Answers

CPACE-Content Overview

The California Preliminary Administrative Credential Examination (CPACE) is designed to test your knowledge and readiness for a career in school administration.

This Computer-based test (CBT) consists of:

  • Content- 70 multiple-choice questions and 3 focused constructed-response assignments. You are provided 3 hours and 15 minutes for this portion of the exam.
  • Performance- 2 performance modules. You are provided 4 hours for this section.

Cost:

CPACE–Content: $294

CPACE–Performance: $358

Scoring:

CPACE scores are reported on a standard range of 100-300. A minimum score of 220 per subtest is required to pass. Test results are available within 5 weeks of testing.

Pass rate:

For July 2015, 65.9% of first-time test takers passed the content portion; 23.5% passed the performance portion.

Study notes:

It is recommended to spend more time studying content with which you are less familiar. In addition to the practice test questions, the following resources should be carefully reviewed:

 

What test takers wish they would’ve known:

  • You must earn a passing score on both subtests to pass the CPACE.
  • You may register to take anyone subtest in a single test session.
  • Any time taken for breaks is considered part of your available testing time.

Information and screenshots obtained from:

California Educator Credentialing Assessments website.

Visionary Leadership

Overview

The Visionary Leadership domain has 12 multiple-choice questions. These questions account for about 17% of the multiple-choice section of the exam.

This domain can be neatly divided into 4 competencies:

  • Developing a Vision of Teaching and Learning
  • Developing a Shared Commitment
  • Leading by Example
  • Sharing Leadership With Others

So, let’s talk about the first competency.

Developing a Vision of Teaching and Learning

This section tests your ability to develop and facilitate a vision for teaching and learning based on your school’s needs.

Let’s talk about a concept that you will more than likely see on the test.

Developing a School Vision

A campus vision may be as brief or detailed as desired; however, keeping the vision simple may help focus attention and promote memory. Here are two examples:

Lee High School, through focused instruction for all students, will be a Top 10 School in its comparison group.

The vision of Laura Bush Middle School is to maintain an exemplary climate, staff, and innovative environment designed to meet students’ unique needs in order to educate and equip all students with life skills to reach their fullest potential academically, socially, and personally.

Developing a Shared Commitment

This section tests your ability to develop and foster a shared commitment to the school’s vision. It is important that all stakeholders are included and valued.

Here is a concept that is likely to appear on the test.

Equity Issues

Equity is about giving every student what they need, not giving every student the same. Some current, common equity issues in schools related to race, diversity, and access include:

  • Student access to college application/admissions support
  • Diverse representation in leadership positions
  • Experience and quality of teachers
  • Facilities in high vs. low-income areas

It is important to ensure that all stakeholders have an opportunity to voice their concerns and work collaboratively with the school leadership to solve these issues.

Leading by Example

This section tests your ability to lead by example, as well as identify and address barriers to the school mission and vision.

Check out this concept.

Communicating Information to Stakeholders

It is important to communicate information about the school on a regular and predictable basis using a variety of formats. Websites and social media accounts should be up to date and checked for accuracy. There may be families without internet access, or in need of special accommodations. The school leadership should survey parents and offer written communication in the preferred language when applicable.

Economics

This section tests your ability to lead by example, as well as identify and address barriers to the school mission and vision.

Check out this concept.

Communicating Information to Stakeholders

It is important to communicate information about the school on a regular and predictable basis using a variety of formats. Websites and social media accounts should be up to date and checked for accuracy. There may be families without internet access, or in need of special accommodations. The school leadership should survey parents and offer written communication in the preferred language when applicable.

Sharing Leadership With Others

This section tests your knowledge of how a school leader collaborates and shares with others in the school community.

This concept may show up on the test.

 

Communicating with Teachers

The following best practices support effective communication between school leaders and teachers:

  • Communicate early and often
  • Communicate face to face as often as possible
  • Develop relationships
  • Allow safe opportunities for faculty to voice concerns
  • Never lie or misrepresent information
  • Maintain confidentiality
  • Be courteous and mindful of the teacher’s schedule
  • Develop and follow a communication plan

Instructional Leadership

Overview

The Instructional Leadership domain has 14 multiple-choice questions. These questions account for about 20% of the multiple-choice section of the exam.

This domain can be neatly divided into 4 competencies:

  • Promoting Implementation of Standards, Skills, Instructional Practices, and Assessment
  • Evaluating, Analyzing, and Providing Feedback
  • Demonstrating Understanding of the School and Community Context
  • Communicating with the School Community

So, let’s talk about the first competency.

Promoting Implementation of Standards, Skills, Instructional Practices, and Assessment

This section tests your knowledge of standards, skills, instructional practices, and assessments in the K-12 school setting.

Here is a concept that is likely to appear on the test.

Building a Positive School Culture

The principal is the leader of the school, and he or she is ultimately responsible for a positive culture. Teachers, staff, students, and parents should feel proud to attend school. There should be a feeling of confidence that the leadership is able to do the following:

  • Build strong relationships
  • Teach essential social skills
  • Get on the same page
  • Be role models
  • Clarify classroom and school rules
  • Teach all students problem solving
  • Set appropriate consequences
  • Praise students for good choices

Evaluating, Analyzing, and Providing Feedback

This section tests your knowledge of effective instructional feedback. Specifically, are you able to evaluate, analyze, and provide feedback that promotes learning?

Check out this concept.

Observing Classrooms

A principal is observing many things while in a classroom. For example, related to the curriculum, the principal will want to consider the following:

  • Clear, appropriate objectives are posted and/or stated
  • Teacher models new concepts
  • Lessons are focused and directed toward objectives
  • Evidence of continuity of lessons based on student need
  • Topics are appropriate to the developmental level of students

Note: Many school districts have an internal checklist for principals to utilize during an observation. This checklist will align with state standards and requirements.

Demonstrating Understanding of the School and Community Context

This section tests your knowledge of the school and community context. It is important to understand the specific needs and barriers faced based on demographics, resources, etc.

Let’s look at a concept.

Personal Bias

Personal bias is a subtle difference in perception that can result in unconscious discrimination. Consider the following examples common in school environments:

  • Boys cannot sit still
  • Girls perform poorly in math
  • Well-behaved students outperform non-compliant students

It is important to acknowledge bias. Making decisions based on data, rather than opinion or emotion, can help eliminate bias in the classroom.

Communicating with the School Community

This section tests your knowledge of how to effectively communicate with the school community.

Here is a concept that is likely to appear on the test.

Engaging Guardians in Behavior Management Systems

Remember that poor behavior is not isolated to one environment. If a child exhibits behavior problems at school, there may also be issues at home. Parents/ guardians play an important role in shaping behavior. Having a consistent approach at school and home will help the child to adjust at a faster rate.

Teachers might do the following in order to engage parents/guardians:

  • Clearly communicate the expectations and consequences within the classroom
  • Collaborate with parents or guardians to find motivators specific to the child
  • Develop a behavior contract that goes back and forth between school and home
  • Stress consistency

School Improvement Leadership

Overview

The School Improvement Leadership domain has 12 multiple-choice questions. These questions account for about 17% of the multiple-choice section of the exam.

This domain can be neatly divided into 4 competencies:

  • Developing a Data-Based School Growth Plan
  • Implementing Change Strategies
  • Identifying and Using Resources
  • Monitoring and Revising the School Growth Plan

So, let’s talk about the first competency.

Developing a Data-Based School Growth Plan

This section tests your knowledge of how to work with others and develop a data-based school growth plan.

Let’s look at a concept.

School Change Process

Outsiders and insiders must be involved in the change process. Make sure ideas and solutions are coming from different perspectives. One group should not maintain all of the power or decision-making.

Asking the following key questions can help institute, manage, and evaluate a change process:

  • What is the school vision?
  • Who are the stakeholders?
  • What are the skills/capacities needed to change?
  • What are the incentives or motivations to change?
  • What resources are available?
  • Who will manage each step of the action plan?
  • How is data driving the action plan?
  • How often will the process/data be reviewed and updated?

Implementing Change Strategies

This section tests your knowledge of implementing change strategies based on theory and best practices.

Here is a concept you should know for the test.

Promoting Collaborative Decision-Making and Problem-Solving

The following best practices are recommended to promote collaborative decision-making and problem-solving:

 

Identifying and Using Resources

This section tests your knowledge of resources needed to implement the school growth plan.

Let’s take a look at a concept you need to know.

Establishing a Strong Professional Culture

School leaders should model a strong professional culture where staff learning and growth is encouraged. Here are suggested steps:

  • Clearly define the vision
  • Practice what you preach
  • Embrace a digital mindset: learning occurs anytime, anywhere
  • Balance district-wide initiatives with professional development that is meaningful and personal to the individual
  • Move from hours-based to outcomes-based accountability
  • Empower staff to design their own learning
  • Solicit teacher feedback
  • Encourage collaboration across subject areas, grades, departments, and schools

Monitoring and Revising the School Growth Plan

This section tests your knowledge of monitoring and revising the school growth plan based on student outcomes.

Read over this concept.

Progress Monitoring

The school’s strategies for continuous progress monitoring of the growth plan should be created by the stakeholders based on a workable and agreeable timeline. The principal can support this process by providing time for collaboration, limiting other meetings, and making sure all data reports are current. It is important to schedule time to work on the growth plan throughout the year, and not wait to do all of the work at the end of the instructional cycle. If something is not working, now is the time to address it!

Note: The following website contains many tools and resources specific to California schools:

https://www.cde.ca.gov

Professional Learning and Growth Leadership

Overview

The Professional Learning and Growth Leadership domain has 11 multiple-choice questions. These questions account for about 16% of the multiple-choice section of the exam.

This domain can be neatly divided into 3 competencies:

  • Modeling Lifelong Learning and Professional Growth
  • Helping Teachers Through Professional Growth Activities
  • Identifying and Facilitating a Variety of Professional and Personal Growth Opportunities

So, let’s talk about the first competency.

Modeling Lifelong Learning and Professional Growth

This section tests your ability to model lifelong learning and professional growth.

Here is a concept you should know for the test.

Modeling Self-Improvement

School leaders can model the following activities in order to grow and encourage others to self-improve:

  • Take risks/try new approaches to problem-solving
  • Set and work towards well-defined, specific goals
  • Schedule time effectively
  • Seek and respond to feedback
  • Look for opportunities to learn from and work with others

Helping Teachers Through Professional Growth Activities

This section tests your knowledge of helping teachers through professional growth activities.

Take a look at this concept.

Mentoring

A helpful mentor is willing and able to balance the following:

  • Listen open-mindedly
  • Respects the mentee
  • Encourages the mentee to see issues from different perspectives
  • Celebrates successes-big or small!
  • Provides a safe space
  • Models best practices
  • Shows appreciation for differences in teaching styles and opinions

The instructional leader must develop a flexible and consistent schedule, allowing the mentor and mentee time to collaborate.

Identifying and Facilitating a Variety of Professional and Personal Growth Opportunities

This section tests your knowledge of professional and personal growth opportunities.

Take a look at this concept.

Personal Growth Opportunities for Parents

One example of a school providing personal growth opportunities for parents is hosting an on-site English language class. In certain sections of California, there may be parents with limited English proficiency. Inviting parents to attend a class to help develop personal skills will also allow them to communicate with school employees and become actively involved in their child’s education.

Organizational and Systems Leadership

Overview

The Organizational and Systems Leadership domain has 11 multiple-choice questions. These questions account for about 16% of the multiple-choice section of the exam.

This domain can be neatly divided into 3 competencies:

  • Understanding and Managing the School’s Systems
  • Developing, Implementing, and Monitoring the School’s Budget
  • Implementing Laws, Guidelines, Requirements, and Regulations

So, let’s talk about the first competency.

Understanding and Managing the School’s Systems

This section tests your ability to understand and manage the school’s systems.

Let’s take a look at a concept you need to know.

Managing Conflict

Conflicts may arise between students, staff members, etc. One example would be two teachers assigned to the same “team”. Perhaps one teacher is a veteran educator, while the other is fresh out of college. Their teaching styles differ. The veteran teacher wants the schedule to remain the same and use last year’s lesson plans, while the newly hired teacher wants to try new ideas. When the relationship begins to affect the students, the principal must intervene and mediate.

It is suggested to meet with both teachers, together, in a neutral setting. The principal must present the issues, ask for input from both teachers, and facilitate an action plan to resolve the conflict and move forward. The principal should avoid closed discussions with each teacher individually, and attempt to keep the conversation transparent to both involved parties.

Developing, Implementing, and Monitoring the School’s Budget

This section tests your knowledge of developing, implementing, and monitoring the school’s budget.

Here is a concept you need to know.

Developing Campus Budgets

Budgeting is the process of allocating resources to the prioritized needs of the school. In most cases, the budget represents the legal authority to spend money. Adoption of a budget should consider the needs of the given campus. All decisions should be based on data. For example, the second-grade state assessment scores in reading may fall short of projections. A new reading program may be proposed and budgeted if the leadership believes it addresses the specific reading needs of that student population. This is a data-driven decision.

Implementing Laws, Guidelines, Requirements, and Regulations

This section tests your knowledge of California laws, guidelines, requirements, and regulations for schools.

Let’s take a look at a concept you need to know.

Specific Laws Related to Students with Disabilities

There are three federal laws that protect the rights of people with disabilities. This includes individuals with learning and attention issues. The laws include:

  • Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)- This is a civil rights law that restricts discrimination based on disability in schools, work environments and public places.
  • Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)- This is an education law that mandates schools to provide special education and needed services to students with disabilities who require them for their education.
  • Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act- This is a civil rights law for schools that receive federal funding that restricts discrimination on the based on disability.

Community Leadership

Overview

The Community Leadership domain has 10 multiple-choice questions. These questions account for about 14% of the multiple-choice section of the exam.

This domain can be neatly divided into 2 competencies:

  • Representing and Promoting the School’s Accomplishments and Needs
  • Involving the Community

So, let’s talk about the first competency.

Representing and Promoting the School’s Accomplishments and Needs

This section tests your knowledge of representing the school’s accomplishments and needs. As a leader, you must be able to represent the school and act as its spokesperson.

Let’s take a look at a concept you need to know.

Public Speaking

Effective public speaking will be authentic, appropriate for the audience, and delivered by a person in authority.

  • Authentic– The information should be personal and relevant to both the speaker and the audience.
  • Audience– The speaker should consider the prior knowledge and attention span of the audience members. For example, when introducing a new grading policy, the speaker will deliver a different message to the first grade students as compared to their parents.
  • Authority– The person delivering the message should understand the information, be able to answer questions, etc. This person can speak with authority.

Involving the Community

This section tests your knowledge of involving the community in helping achieve the school’s vision and goals.

Here is a concept you need to know.

Strategies for Involving the Community

Prior to implementing a plan to involve the community, consider the following activities:

  1. Brainstorm the following with your staff:
  • How do we identify and describe the community we serve?
  • What is our relationship with the community like? Would we like it to change?
  • What are available community resources?
  • What would we like from our community?
  1. Ask your Parent Associate for ideas, input, and feedback.
  2. Create a plan for community outreach that involves teachers, students, administration, and parents.

Focused Written Assignments

Overview

There will be 3 focused written assignments on the exam. For each assignment, you should write a response of approximately 150-300 words. Your responses will be scored based on a rubric.

Here are a few tips to keep in mind:

  • Stay focused on the assigned topic
  • Write for an audience of educators knowledgeable about educational leadership
  • Read and review your work

And that’s some basic info about the exam.

 Now, let’s look at a few practice questions in each area to see how these concepts might actually appear on the real test.

Practice Questions and Answers Practice Test

Questions 1-3 refer to the following information.

Mrs. McMahan has recently been hired as the new principal of Ashville Middle School. She wants to begin her term as principal in a positive way. To do so, she creates the following plan.

STEPS

  1. During the beginning of the year meetings, listen to teachers’ views on school strengths, needs, and ways to improve the campus.
  2. Alongside teachers, create a new campus mission statement including specific goals to attain the mission.
  3. Work collaboratively with teachers to review curriculum, instruction, and assessments; facilitate the development of a specific plan to meet the goals created in step 2.

Question 1

The main advantage of the meetings described in step 1 is most likely to:

  1. allow Mrs. McMahan the chance to explain her expectations to teachers
  2. produce a source of information for Mrs. McMahan to evaluate the needs of the campus
  3. familiarize the teachers with Mrs. McMahan’s leadership style
  4. encourage the teachers to spend time reflecting on their current mastery of the profession

Correct answer: 2

Explanations:

  1. The teachers will learn about Mrs. McMahan’s expectations; however, this is not the primary benefit. Mrs. McMahan is not providing information, but rather seeking it.
  2. This is the best answer choice. An effective and successful principal knows that teachers are the most important resource for finding and uncovering the needs of campus. This information will help achieve the goals of steps 2 and 3.
  3. Mrs. McMahan is looking for information. It is unlikely that this act will strongly demonstrate her leadership style.
  4. Since reflection is introspective (within oneself), this process is unlikely to result in the teachers reflecting on their professional knowledge since they are being asked to outwardly share information regarding the strengths and needs of the campus.

Question 2

The greatest advantage of step 3 is that it is likely to:

  1. correlate student learning to specific teaching strategies
  2. encourage teachers to self-assess their teaching
  3. help identify specific teachers who can take charge of specific action plans
  4. promote innovative thinking and problem-solving to attain goals

Correct answer: 1

Explanations:

  1. This is the best answer choice. The goals from the mission statement can help the teachers identify the teaching practices and strategies that best achieve those specific goals. Once the goals have been achieved, the mission is fulfilled. This is the greatest advantage of reviewing the curriculum, instruction, and assessment and then creating a plan to meet the goals of the newly-created mission statement.
  2. This answer choice is a possible secondary benefit.
  3. This answer choice is a possible secondary benefit.
  4. This answer choice is a possible secondary benefit.

Question 3

Mrs. McMahan’s plan can be improved by:

  1. looking at other campuses’ mission statements as models
  2. giving a few teachers more control and authority in the process
  3. clearly stating her expectations regarding the outcomes of the recommended changes
  4. asking caregivers, students, and support staff to be involved in the process

Correct answer: 4

Explanations:

  1. Other schools may not share the same specific mission and goals of Ashville Middle School.
  2. Since Mrs. McMahan’s purpose is to facilitate a collaborative process, giving a few teachers more control and authority undermines that goal. Every teacher’s input is valuable.
  3. By stating her expectations of the outcome, Mrs. McMahan is narrowing the collaborative process. Instead of problem-solving and keeping options open, teachers may only focus on achieving Mrs. McMahan’s specific, desired outcome.
  4. The process should include every major stakeholder group, because it affects all caregivers, students, and staff members. Involving all members of the school community will create a shared commitment to reaching the goals as described in the mission statement.

Questions 4-6 refer to the following information.

The new principal at Waypoint Elementary School, Mr. Domingo, begins his position in January. He learns that a new teacher, Mr. Brown, is struggling. Standardized assessment data shows that the scores in Mr. Brown’s social studies class are very low. Mr. Domingo decides to take action and address the test scores and Mr. Brown’s performance, even though fully assessing the needs of the school will take time.

Question 4

Mr. Domingo obtains all of the written documentation regarding Mr. Brown’s performance, including classroom observations, mentor reports, and recommendations for improvement. When deciding whether or not to renew Mr. Brown’s contract, which of the following is the most important question for Mr. Domingo to answer?

  1. What attempts have Mr. Brown made to improve?
  2. Does Mr. Brown meet the minimum legal requirements for dismissal?
  3. What resources are available on campus to support Mr. Brown?
  4. Did Mr. Brown go to the district-wide new-employee training?

Correct answer: 2

Explanations:

  1. Based on the documentation, it is obvious that Mr. Brown’s attempts to improve have not yielded positive results; therefore, this question is irrelevant.
  2. This is the best answer choice. California has very specific requirements pertaining to terminating teachers; therefore, it is very important for Mr. Domingo to be well-aware of these laws and take steps to follow those laws to ensure the district is protected.
  3. There is substantial documentation of Mr. Brown receiving various levels of support; additional resources will probably not result in improved performance.
  4. Whether Mr. Brown attended new-employee training or not is irrelevant to employee dismissal.

Question 5

Over the next few days, Mr. Domingo analyzes social studies report card grades and standardized assessment scores of all the students at Waypoint Elementary School. This results in raising several concerns. Mr. Domingo decides to facilitate a meeting with all the social studies teachers so that they can review the data. The goals of the meeting include reviewing the data, gathering feedback, and creating an action plan. By doing this, Mr. Domingo is:

  1. showing the teachers that their performance is being watched very closely
  2. accounting for what motivates the teachers and how they learn best
  3. participating in continuing professional development to grow social studies content knowledge
  4. analyzing data from various sources and working collaboratively with staff members to reach school-wide goals

Correct answer: 4

Explanations:

  1. Micromanaging the social studies teachers will not improve their performance in the classroom; this action is likely to have a negative impact on motivation and performance. It is hard to perform under scrutiny.
  2. The teachers are not receiving instruction; therefore, what motivates them to learn is irrelevant.
  3. Mr. Domingo is not participating in or providing professional development, but rather an educational task force focused on setting and meeting goals.
  4. This is the best answer choice. Mr. Domingo has reviewed and analyzed report card and standardized assessment grades. He is currently working with teachers to find ways to improve student performance in social studies.

Question 6

A high school principal uses campus-wide professional development to emphasize the importance of communicating high expectations to all students, despite gender, ethnicity, or disability. This specific issue is most effective in satisfying which of the following responsibilities of an administrator?

  1. providing a forum where teachers can voice their concerns about specific students
  2. promoting teamwork and nurturing relationships among diverse faculty members
  3. creating a school culture that responds to the diverse needs of the students
  4. ensuring that the school follows all state and federal laws

Correct answer: 3

Explanations:

  1. This does not directly relate to the professional development topic addressed by the principal.
  2. This does not directly relate to the professional development topic addressed by the principal.
  3. This is the best answer choice. It is the principal’s responsibility to create an inclusive school culture by providing teachers with appropriate professional development.
  4. This does not directly relate to the professional development topic addressed by the principal.

Question 7

The caregivers of a student who receives special education services complain that their daughter was not chosen for the junior varsity cheerleading squad because she has a disability. They insist she be placed on the squad or they will lodge a formal complaint with the Office for Civil Rights. Which of the following describes the most appropriate first step by the principal?

  1. contact the district’s Title IX coordinator for advice on the legal implications of the matter.
  2. allow the student to try out for the squad again.
  3. explain the selection criteria for the cheerleading squad and the specific laws pertaining to students with disabilities.
  4. ask the cheerleading coach to assess the student’s cheerleading abilities and meet with the parents to discuss the results.

Correct answer: 3

Explanations:

  1. Title IX, a law dictating gender equity in school sports programs, is not relevant to this situation, as gender is not the issue.
  2. Allowing the student to try out for the squad again is likely to result in the same outcome.
  3. This is the best answer choice. The best first step for the principal to take is to listen to the parents and explain how cheerleaders are chosen and what the law stipulates about students with disabilities.
  4. This step may be appropriate after initially meeting with parents to explain the selection process and relevant laws.

Question 8

While observing a science lesson, a middle school principal notices that the teacher uses a hands-on experiment to open the lesson. Students generate hypotheses about what will happen and then discuss the results afterward. The teacher’s primary purpose for using an experiment to open the lesson is to

  1. emphasize steps of the Scientific Method
  2. develop critical thinking skills
  3. assess students’ prior knowledge
  4. engage students in the learning process

Correct answer: 4

Explanations:

  1. The teacher is not primarily using the experiment to teach the steps of the Scientific Method, especially since the teacher is not conducting every step of the process.
  2. The teacher is not challenging students to apply new knowledge in novel situations; therefore, this experiment is not focusing on developing critical thinking skills.
  3. The teacher is not primarily using the experiment to assess students’ prior knowledge; however, the teacher may uncover some of what the students already know about the topic.
  4. This is the best answer choice. The teacher is providing a fun, hands-on experiment to open a lesson and engage students in the learning process.

Question 9

Which THREE of the following practices by a principal are most effective for building staff morale?

  1. encouraging competition among teachers
  2. seeking to provide the specific resources desired by teachers
  3. recognizing exemplary teachers during staff meetings
  4. involving teachers in making high-stakes decisions regarding the campus budget
  5. treating each teacher as an individual

Correct answers: B, C, E

Explanation: Providing requested resources, recognizing teachers, and viewing each teacher as an individual person will all effectively build staff morale. Encouraging competition and asking teachers to make high-stakes decisions will not build morale.

Question 10

Which of the following is the most important reason for maintaining a database of playground maintenance and repair records?

  1. to identify approved vendors when playground equipment is needed
  2. to prevent emergency repairs from occurring with playground equipment
  3. to encourage teachers to maintain the playground equipment between regularly scheduled maintenance
  4. to ensure effective organizational management and safety of students

Correct answer: 4

Explanations:

  1. Having an approved list of vendors is important, but this is not related to maintaining a database of playground maintenance and repairs.
  2. Emergency repairs may happen regardless of whether a database exists or not.
  3. Teachers should not be responsible for maintaining playground equipment; this is also not related to maintaining a database.
  4. A record of playground maintenance and repairs can be used to improve organizational management, justify costs for preventative maintenance, and ensure students are playing on safe and well-maintained equipment.
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